GET /api/0.2/search/?fulltext=Hiroshima%2C+Japan&page=8
HTTP 200 OK
Allow: GET, POST, HEAD, OPTIONS
Content-Type: application/json
Vary: Accept

{
    "total": 198,
    "limit": 25,
    "offset": 175,
    "prev_offset": 150,
    "next_offset": null,
    "page_size": 25,
    "this_page": 8,
    "num_this_page": 23,
    "prev_api": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/search/?fulltext=Hiroshima, Japan&limit=25&offset=150",
    "next_api": "",
    "objects": [
        {
            "id": "ddr-pc-31-9",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "0 175/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-pc-31-9/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-pc-31-9/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-pc-31/ddr-pc-31-9-mezzanine-e27d50e92d-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-pc-31/ddr-pc-31-9-mezzanine-e27d50e92d-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Pacific Citizen, Vol. 48, No. 9 (February 27, 1959)",
            "description": "Selected article titles: \"Wakamatsu calls for 50,000 in JACL ranks\" (p. 1), \"JACL-sponsored bill repealing Idaho anti-miscegenation law passes both houses\" (p. 1), \"Father of author of 'Home Again' vows film will be made\" (p. 1), \"Holder of top award from Garden Club of America, an Issei widow, revisits Japan\" (p. 2), \"Hiroshima social worker completes thesis on adjustment of soldier brides in Milwaukee, limits survey to JACL members\" (p. 3), \"17,000 JACL membership in '59 not considered too optimistic; but chapters should boost own local programs to insure success\" (p. 5), \"Oregon legislator lauds Nisei in Congressional record remark\" (p. 8); \"Nisei Week planners form corporation\" (p. 8).",
            "extent": "11W x 17H",
            "links_children": "ddr-pc-31-9",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "publisher",
                    "namepart": "Japanese American Citizens League"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Journalism and media -- Community publications -- Pacific Citizen",
                    "id": "389"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Community activities -- Associations and organizations -- The Japanese American Citizens League",
                    "id": "20"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Activism and involvement -- Civil rights",
                    "id": "234"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Race and racism -- Discrimination",
                    "id": "37"
                }
            ],
            "format": "doc",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "persons": [
                "Hayashi, Aki",
                "Motoyoshi, Meriko",
                "Wakamatsu, Shig",
                "Honda, Harry K.",
                "Takata, Fred",
                "Murayama, Tamotsu",
                "Nishida, Cardina",
                "Nishida, George",
                "Hiraoka, Harry",
                "Furuzawa, Sachiko",
                "Yasumoto, James",
                "Sato, Reiko",
                "Hosokawa, Bill",
                "Okamura, Kaoru",
                "Matsumoto, Bill",
                "Yoshimura, Akiji",
                "Yoshida, Roy",
                "Ogawa, Elmer",
                "Hayashi, Bill",
                "Takao, Tomi Carolyn",
                "Masaoka, Mike",
                "Okura, Pat",
                "Yatabe, Thomas T."
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "periodical",
            "location": "Los Angeles, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-109-17",
            "model": "segment",
            "index": "1 176/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-109-17/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-109-17/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-tasano-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-tasano-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Asano Terao Interview II Segment 17",
            "description": "Clashing opinions; disagreeing with the Kibeis' belief that Japan would win the war (Japanese language)<p>This interview was conducted in Japanese and was translated so as to convey Mrs. Terao's way of speaking as closely as possible. For example, there are instances in which she makes some grammatical errors. These mistakes are conveyed through similar grammatical errors in English in order to recreate Mrs. Terao's manner of speaking. Mrs. Terao speaks in the Hiroshima dialect.",
            "extent": "00:04:15",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-109-17",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 109,
                    "namepart": "Asano Terao"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Tomoyo Yamada"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Dee Goto"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Matt Emery"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Kibei",
                    "id": "45"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-109-2",
            "model": "segment",
            "index": "2 177/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-109-2/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-109-2/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-tasano-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-tasano-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Asano Terao Interview II Segment 2",
            "description": "Reaction to the bombing of Pearl Harbor; believing \"there was no way Japan would win\" (Japanese language)<p>This interview was conducted in Japanese and was translated so as to convey Mrs. Terao's way of speaking as closely as possible. For example, there are instances in which she makes some grammatical errors. These mistakes are conveyed through similar grammatical errors in English in order to recreate Mrs. Terao's manner of speaking. Mrs. Terao speaks in the Hiroshima dialect.",
            "extent": "00:02:28",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-109-2",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 109,
                    "namepart": "Asano Terao"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Tomoyo Yamada"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Dee Goto"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Matt Emery"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "World War II -- Pearl Harbor and aftermath -- Personal recollections",
                    "id": "51"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "geography": [
                {
                    "term": "Seattle, Washington",
                    "id": "\"http://vocab.getty.edu/tgn/7014494\""
                }
            ],
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-108-19",
            "model": "segment",
            "index": "3 178/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-108-19/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-108-19/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-tasano-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-tasano-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Asano Terao Interview I Segment 19",
            "description": "Losing touch with friends and teachers in Japan; some killed by the atomic bomb (Japanese language)<p>This interview was conducted in Japanese and was translated so as to convey Mrs. Terao's way of speaking as closely as possible. For example, there are instances in which she makes some grammatical errors. These mistakes are conveyed through similar grammatical errors in English in order to recreate Mrs. Terao's manner of speaking. Mrs. Terao speaks in the Hiroshima dialect.",
            "extent": "00:01:47",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-108-19",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 109,
                    "namepart": "Asano Terao"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Tomoyo Yamada"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Dee Goto"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Matt Emery"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "geography": [
                {
                    "term": "Japan",
                    "id": "\"http://vocab.getty.edu/tgn/1000120\""
                }
            ],
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-7",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "4 179/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-7/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-7/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-7-1-mezzanine-681d36effc-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-7-1-mezzanine-681d36effc-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Yuriko Furubayashi Interview",
            "description": "Yuriko Furubayashi was born in 1927 in Waimea, Hawai'i, as one of the ten children of the family. Her father had come to Hawai'i from Hiroshima in the mid-1910s as a contract worker on a pineapple plantation. He grew vegetables and kept chickens around the house to help feed the family. Her mother cooked Japanese food only in part because meat was hard to come by. Many of their co-workers on the plantation were Japanese, and Yuriko used to go to the after-school school at Hongan-ji with these co-workers' children. Her peers at the public school included Filipinos, Chinese, Polynesians, Portuguese, and Haoles. When she was ten years old, her uncle and aunt in Los Angeles, who had been successful owners of Olympic Hotel, took her to Japan. They were childless, so their plan was to make Yuriko the family's heir. Yuriko quickly adjusted to the life in Japan and graduated from high school. She was working in an airplane factory when the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. Although she was not injured, she was irradiated because she walked through the city on the day after to look for her aunt and uncle. The entire city was still on fire. She saw many corpses and people with severe nuclear burns. She lost one of her uncles to the bomb. She also visited her friend working at an orphanage, and was struck by how many children had lost their parents to the bomb. In 1948, she went to Hawai'i to see her parents, thanks to the arrangement made by her brother who had come to Japan as part of the US occupation force. She decided that she did not want to go back to Hiroshima where memories of the destruction \"depressed\" her. She studied to regain her English and worked at her sister's bakery near Kahoku. She married a baker, and they became successful owners of another bakery named after their oldest son. Yuriko was somewhat worried about radiation effect when she was pregnant with her first child. She gained hibakusha techo (certificate of survivorhood) issued by the Japanese government in the 1960s. She also regularly attends the biannual health checkups conducted by Japanese physicians for American survivors.",
            "extent": "2:52:35",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-7",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 968,
                    "namepart": "Yuriko Furubayashi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Kailua, Hawai‘i",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "86",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "5 180/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/86/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/86/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/sfloyd.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/sfloyd.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/86/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Floyd Schmoe",
            "bio": "White male. Born September 21, 1895. Sixth generation Quaker and an internationally recognized pacifist and peace activist. He was a forest ecologist, marine biologist, college professor, and leader of many volunteer service groups. During World War II, he was a leader in persuading colleges outside of the evacuation zone to accept Japanese American students, and in many other ways served the Japanese American community during their incarceration, and as they restarted their lives following the war. At the end of the war, he turned his attention to Japan and worked on recovery efforts there by building homes in Hiroshima. At the age of ninety-five he created the Seattle Peace Park, planning, bulldozing and planting the park in memorial to lives lost in the bombing of Japan, and as a testimony to peace."
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-csujad-38-161",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "6 181/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-csujad-38-161/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-csujad-38-161/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-csujad-38/ddr-csujad-38-161-mezzanine-658cadf412-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-csujad-38/ddr-csujad-38-161-mezzanine-658cadf412-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "George Naohara's handwritten annotations",
            "description": "English translation of the annotations from \"George Naohara photo album\" (csudh_nao_0001), page 12: [Right] Japan declared a war, and Japanese Imperial Army attacked Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. When the war broke out, Yuta Masukawa was visiting Little Tokyo, Los Angeles. He rode on a streetcar to get to Little Tokyo and bought a record, \"Shina no yoru,\" for his sister, Mitsuko.  [Left] Alameda Street was a busy street and streetcars were running alongside the street. There was a Japanese school, which was called \"Banguru,\" on the west side of the street. I visited the post office to check my incoming mails. There was nothing for me. I came here, following my uncle, Koichi Naohara, who had been already settled in the United States. Although I came to the U.S. all the way from Japan traveling by a big ship called \"Kamakura-maru,\" there were no jobs available for me because of the Great Depression. I had a decent job in Japan, working for a post office, which was a Japanese government job, near the Hiroshima Station, and it was difficult for me to accept a job which paid me only 30 cents per hour in the U.S. While I was spending time alone and feeling lonely, I met Masukawa family which had eight children. I was pleased to learn that Mrs. Masukawa was Shuzo Myoren's sister who was from Karuga Asa-gun, Hiroshima. Once I met Mitzi, one of the Maskawa family's daughters, I fell in love.  See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: <a href=\"http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/15650\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\">nao_01_012</a>",
            "extent": "1 page, 8 x 8.75 inches, handwritten",
            "links_children": "ddr-csujad-38-161",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "author",
                    "namepart": "Naohara, George, 1919-2014"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Kibei",
                    "id": "45"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Geographic communities -- California -- Los Angeles",
                    "id": "272"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Immigration and citizenship -- Life in Japan and reasons for leaving",
                    "id": "2"
                }
            ],
            "format": "doc",
            "language": [
                "jpn"
            ],
            "contributor": "CSU Dominguez Hills Department of Archives and Special Collections",
            "rights": "nocc",
            "genre": "misc_document",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "52",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "7 182/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/52/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/52/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/mmitsue.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/mmitsue.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/52/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Mitsue Matsui",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born November 3, 1918, in San Francisco, California. As a young woman, entire family visited Japan for ten months, where she acquired the skill of Japanese typing at the Kumahira Typist Yoseisho in Hiroshima. Returned to the U.S. with most of her family (eldest brother remained in Japan) and was working at the Japanese Chamber of Commerce in San Francisco when the U.S. entered World War II. Was incarcerated with the family at Tanforan Assembly Center, San Bruno, California and Topaz concentration camp, Utah. After spending a year at Topaz, was able to secure employment as a Japanese typist at the Military Intelligence Service Language School (MISLS), Camp Savage and Fort Snelling, Minnesota. Soon thereafter, was temporarily assigned as secretary to Mr. John F. Aiso and remained in that capacity until Major Aiso received orders to go overseas. Married a MISLS instructor, and went again to Japan postwar during her husband's service in the U.S. occupation forces."
        },
        {
            "id": "847",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "8 183/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/847/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/847/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ytokio.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ytokio.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/847/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Tokio Yamane",
            "bio": "Kibei male. Born 1922 in Hawaii. Moved with family to Hiroshima at age three, then returned to the Fresno area of the U.S. for high school. During World War II, was sent to the Fresno Assembly Center, California, and the Jerome concentration camp, Arkansas. While at Jerome, refused to answer the so-called \"loyalty questions\" and was transferred to Tule Lake concentration camp when it became a segregation center. At the end of 1943, was involved in a confrontation with camp administrators and was severely beaten by War Relocation Officials and thrown in Tule Lake's stockade. While in the stockade, participated in a hunger strike, and later helped to organize young people's groups with the goal of going to Japan. Eventually renounced U.S. citizenship and was sent to the Santa Fe Department of Justice camp before expatriation to Japan. Remained in Japan after the war, working for the U.S. occupation army and then in private business."
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-pc-28-41",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "9 184/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-pc-28-41/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-pc-28-41/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-pc-28/ddr-pc-28-41-mezzanine-a278e95e14-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-pc-28/ddr-pc-28-41-mezzanine-a278e95e14-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Pacific Citizen, Vol. 43, No. 15 (October 12, 1956)",
            "description": "Selected article titles: \" Masaoka ill, postpones trip to Japan a week\" (p. 1), \"55 of 65 Nisei public office seekers win in Hawaii primaries\" (p. 1), \"Tabulate 141,000 Japanese in U.S.; 85,000 in California\" (p. 1), \"Temporary farm workers continue to arrive by air\" (p. 1), \"Fresno-born Nisei interprets for Japanese emperor\" (p. 2), \"One of 25 Hiroshima Maidens marries Nisei cousin, resides in Gardena\" (p. 2), \"Vandals Plague Fresno Home-owner second time\" (p. 2), \"Arizonan raps use of Japanese, P.I. temporary laborers\" (p. 3) \"JACL Credit Union Votes to Aid Pasadena Group Under State Eye\" (p. 3), \"Nisei Gl 148 lb. weightlifter eyes Melbourne Olympic games\" (p. 6), \"Veterans group opposes establishment of Seattle Japanese language school\" (p. 8).",
            "extent": "11.5W x 17H",
            "links_children": "ddr-pc-28-41",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "author",
                    "namepart": "Japanese American Citizens League"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Community activities -- Associations and organizations -- The Japanese American Citizens League",
                    "id": "20"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Journalism and media -- Community publications -- Pacific Citizen",
                    "id": "389"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Activism and involvement -- Civil rights",
                    "id": "234"
                }
            ],
            "format": "doc",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "persons": [
                "Masaoka, Mike",
                "Ota, Peter I.",
                "Sakano, Theodore Kiichiro",
                "Satow, Masao",
                "Heima, Tatsuhiko",
                "Hosokawa, Bill",
                "Nara, Yasuhiko",
                "Matsuda, Clarence G.",
                "Udo, Keishi",
                "Kuramoto, Mitsuko",
                "Murayama, Tamotsu",
                "Tajiri, Larry S.",
                "Miki, Lily",
                "Sakata, Robert",
                "Tamura, Alice T.",
                "Honda, Harry K.",
                "Nishikawa, Roy M.",
                "Ogawa, Elmer",
                "Iwasaki, Larry",
                "Yamagata, Shinny",
                "Mori, Henry",
                "Ono, Amy",
                "Tagawa, Tsutomu"
            ],
            "contributor": "Pacific Citizen",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "periodical",
            "location": "Los Angeles, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-csujad-5-190",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "10 185/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-csujad-5-190/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-csujad-5-190/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-190-mezzanine-0cd2c9126d-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-190-mezzanine-0cd2c9126d-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Letter from Masao Okine to Mr. and Mrs. S. Okine, February 18, 1946 [in Japanese]",
            "description": "A letter from Masao Okine to his parents, Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine, along with a note in English. He writes from Tokyo, Japan, where he is stationed as a Nisei soldier. The letter is mailed via San Francisco by the U.S. Postal Service. In the letter, Masao informs that he has been transferred from Sagamihara to Tokyo, Japan a month ago and received only three letters from his parents since then. He assumes that the arrival of other letters would be delayed because of his address change. He worries about his family in California and informs that he is going to visit Hiroshima to see the relatives and friends. He also encloses an English note stating that he needs 4 cartons of cigarettes and mixed candies to be shipped. He instructs his parents to bring the note to the U.S. Post Office when they ship the cigarettes and candies to Japan. He also describes his life in Japan: Tokyo is convenient and he made friends with the Japanese. He often visits a friend's place and is treated as if he is one of their family members. The arrival date of the letter, March 18, 1946, and the replied date, March 21, 1946, are recorded. Also the shipping fees, 25 cents, are recorded. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: <a href=\"http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/13638\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\">oki_02_34_001</a>",
            "extent": "3 pages, 9.75 x 6.75 inches handwritten; 1 sheet, 7.75 x 5 inches, handwritten; 1 envelope",
            "links_children": "ddr-csujad-5-190",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "author",
                    "namepart": "Okine, Masao"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Japan -- Post-World War II",
                    "id": "165"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Military service -- Postwar occupation of Japan",
                    "id": "199"
                },
                {
                    "term": "World War II -- Military service -- Military Intelligence Service",
                    "id": "91"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Family",
                    "id": "46"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Nisei",
                    "id": "44"
                }
            ],
            "format": "doc",
            "language": [
                "jpn"
            ],
            "contributor": "CSU Dominguez Hills Department of Archives and Special Collections",
            "rights": "nocc",
            "genre": "correspondence",
            "location": "Tokyo, Japan",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-86",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "11 186/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-86/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-86/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-sfloyd-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-sfloyd-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Floyd Schmoe Interview II",
            "description": "White male. Born September 21, 1895. Sixth generation Quaker and an internationally recognized pacifist and peace activist. He was a forest ecologist, marine biologist, college professor, and leader of many volunteer service groups. During World War II, he was a leader in persuading colleges outside of the evacuation zone to accept Japanese American students, and in many other ways served the Japanese American community during their incarceration, and as they restarted their lives following the war. At the end of the war, he turned his attention to Japan and worked on recovery efforts there by building homes in Hiroshima. At the age of ninety-five he created the Seattle Peace Park, planning, bulldozing and planting the park in memorial to lives lost in the bombing of Japan, and as a testimony to peace.<p>(In this interview Mr. Schmoe refers to Aki Kurose, a former employee, fellow Quaker, peace activist, and long-time friend.  At the time of this interview, Ms. Kurose had recently passed away after a long struggle with cancer.)",
            "extent": "01:20:53",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-86",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 86,
                    "namepart": "Floyd Schmoe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Elmer Good"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Matt Emery"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-83",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "12 187/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-83/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-83/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-sfloyd-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-sfloyd-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Floyd Schmoe Interview I",
            "description": "White male. Born September 21, 1895. Sixth generation Quaker and an internationally recognized pacifist and peace activist. He was a forest ecologist, marine biologist, college professor, and leader of many volunteer service groups. During World War II, he was a leader in persuading colleges outside of the evacuation zone to accept Japanese American students, and in many other ways served the Japanese American community during their incarceration, and as they restarted their lives following the war. At the end of the war, he turned his attention to Japan and worked on recovery efforts there by building homes in Hiroshima. At the age of ninety-five he created the Seattle Peace Park, planning, bulldozing and planting the park in memorial to lives lost in the bombing of Japan, and as a testimony to peace.<p>(In this interview Mr. Schmoe refers to Aki Kurose, a former employee, fellow Quaker, peace activist, and long-time friend.  At the time of this interview, Ms. Kurose had recently passed away after a long struggle with cancer.)",
            "extent": "01:16:42",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-83",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 86,
                    "namepart": "Floyd Schmoe"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Elmer Good"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Matt Emery"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-432",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "13 188/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-432/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-432/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-ytokio-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-ytokio-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Tokio Yamane Interview",
            "description": "Kibei male. Born 1922 in Hawaii. Moved with family to Hiroshima at age three, then returned to the Fresno area of the U.S. for high school. During World War II, was sent to the Fresno Assembly Center, California, and the Jerome concentration camp, Arkansas. While at Jerome, refused to answer the so-called \"loyalty questions\" and was transferred to Tule Lake concentration camp when it became a segregation center. At the end of 1943, was involved in a confrontation with camp administrators and was severely beaten by War Relocation Officials and thrown in Tule Lake's stockade. While in the stockade, participated in a hunger strike, and later helped to organize young people's groups with the goal of going to Japan. Eventually renounced U.S. citizenship and was sent to the Santa Fe Department of Justice camp before expatriation to Japan. Remained in Japan after the war, working for the U.S. occupation army and then in private business.<p>(This interview was conducted in Japanese. The transcript is a translation of the original interview. This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "04:42:24",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-432",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 847,
                    "namepart": "Yamane, Tokio"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Sachiko Takita-Ishii"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Yoko Murakawa"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Japan",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-csujad-5-275",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "14 189/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-csujad-5-275/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-csujad-5-275/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-275-mezzanine-9e2bf17674-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-275-mezzanine-9e2bf17674-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Letter from Miyuki [Matsuura] to Mr. and Mrs. S. Okine, July 12, 1952 [in Japanese]",
            "description": "A letter from Miyuki Matsuura to her uncle and aunt, Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine. She updates on her crops, picking strawberries, and her fears that the recent cold weather would delay the growth of garlic. She also updates on Mr. Freitas's wedding gift that Seiichi Okine asked her to prepare. She bought a large plate and salad bowl in the same pattern, which she found at a discount in Whittier, California. They are made in Italy and good quality. Including a card, the total costs 7 dollars 86 cents. She also writes about her father, Jokichi Yamanaka, who is traveling in Japan and is going back home to Hiroshima in a week. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: <a href=\"http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/13560\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\">oki_03_10_001</a>",
            "extent": "1 page, 8 x 10 inches, handwritten",
            "links_children": "ddr-csujad-5-275",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "author",
                    "namepart": "Matsuura, Miyuki"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Geographic communities -- California",
                    "id": "271"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Community activities -- Weddings",
                    "id": "28"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Family",
                    "id": "46"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Issei",
                    "id": "43"
                }
            ],
            "format": "doc",
            "language": [
                "jpn"
            ],
            "contributor": "CSU Dominguez Hills Department of Archives and Special Collections",
            "rights": "nocc",
            "genre": "correspondence",
            "location": "San Juan Bautista, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-175",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "15 190/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-175/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-175/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-yjames-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-yjames-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "James Yamazaki Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born in 1916. Grew up in the Los Angeles area, where father was a Buddhist minister. Attended medical school before World War II. During the war, served in the U.S. Army as a doctor with the 106th Infantry Division in Europe. Captured during the Battle of the Bulge and was held in several prisoner of war camps in Germany. After returning to the U.S., worked as a pediatrician for a time before moving to Japan to study the effects of the atomic bombings on children in Hiroshima and Nagasaki.<p>(This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "04:44:15",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-175",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 194,
                    "namepart": "James Yamazaki"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Tom Ikeda"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Carl Wakamoto"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Van Nuys, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-csujad-5-160",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "16 191/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-csujad-5-160/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-csujad-5-160/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-160-mezzanine-52edd21b38-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-160-mezzanine-52edd21b38-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Letter from Masao Okine to Mr. and Mrs. S. Okine, September 12, 1946 [in Japanese]",
            "description": "A letter from Masao Okine, who is stationed in Japan as a Nisei soldier to his parents, Seiichi and Ayame Okine. This letter is mailed via San Francisco, California by the U.S. Army Postal Service. In the letter, Masao writes about his visit to Hiroshima during the vacation. He meets Naoji Okine, Jokichi Yamanaka, Mr. Sasaki, Mr. Nakano, and other relatives. He reports about their well-being and harvesting rice in the following month. He also writes about his schedule for returning to the U.S. He is going to be transferred to Zama, Kanagawa, and return to Yokohama, Kanagawa. From Yokohama, he is going to board a ship to return to the U.S, arriving at the end of the month. He assumes that this letter is his last letter from Japan. The handwritten notes on the backside of the envelope read: Arrived on September 16, 1946, this letter is the last [in Japanese]. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: <a href=\"http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/6790\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\">oki_02_11_001</a>",
            "extent": "2 pages, 6.25 x 9 inches, handwritten; 1 envelope",
            "links_children": "ddr-csujad-5-160",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "author",
                    "namepart": "Okine, Masao"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Military service -- Post-World War II service",
                    "id": "297"
                },
                {
                    "term": "World War II -- Military service -- Military Intelligence Service",
                    "id": "91"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Japan -- Post-World War II",
                    "id": "165"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Family",
                    "id": "46"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Nisei",
                    "id": "44"
                }
            ],
            "format": "doc",
            "language": [
                "jpn"
            ],
            "contributor": "CSU Dominguez Hills Department of Archives and Special Collections",
            "rights": "nocc",
            "genre": "correspondence",
            "location": "Yokohama, Kanagawa",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-184",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "17 192/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-184/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-184/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-hhideo-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-hhideo-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Hideo Hoshide Interview I",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born September 25, 1917, in Tacoma, Washington. Grew up in Tacoma except for living in Japan for several years at age four. Attended the University of Washington in Seattle, majoring in Political Science, Far Eastern Studies, with a minor in journalism. Prior to World War II, worked as sports editor for community newspaper, The Japanese American Courier. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, was removed along with wife to Pinedale Assembly Center, California, and then Tule Lake concentration camp, California. Had a daughter in Tule Lake, and then moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Recruited to work for the U.S. Army's Office of Strategic Services (OSS), was drafted, and trained in India. After the end of the war, was sent to Hiroshima, Japan, to conduct a U.S. government survey studying the effects of the atomic bomb on Japanese citizens. Returned to Seattle in 1946 and was the associate editor for another community newspaper, The Northwest Times. Worked for the Boeing Company postwar while raising a family. Was a founding member of the Seattle Nisei Veterans Committee, working on the group's newsletter for thirty years.",
            "extent": "05:04:07",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-184",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 209,
                    "namepart": "Hideo Hoshide"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Tom Ikeda"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Dana Hoshide"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-185",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "18 193/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-185/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-185/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-hhideo-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-hhideo-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Hideo Hoshide Interview II",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born September 25, 1917, in Tacoma, Washington. Grew up in Tacoma except for living in Japan for several years at age four. Attended the University of Washington in Seattle, majoring in Political Science, Far Eastern Studies, with a minor in journalism. Prior to World War II, worked as sports editor for community newspaper, The Japanese American Courier. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, was removed along with wife to Pinedale Assembly Center, California, and then Tule Lake concentration camp, California. Had a daughter in Tule Lake, and then moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Recruited to work for the U.S. Army's Office of Strategic Services (OSS), was drafted, and trained in India. After the end of the war, was sent to Hiroshima, Japan, to conduct a U.S. government survey studying the effects of the atomic bomb on Japanese citizens. Returned to Seattle in 1946 and was the associate editor for another community newspaper, The Northwest Times. Worked for the Boeing Company postwar while raising a family. Was a founding member of the Seattle Nisei Veterans Committee, working on the group's newsletter for thirty years.",
            "extent": "04:24:23",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1000-185",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 209,
                    "namepart": "Hideo Hoshide"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Tom Ikeda"
                },
                {
                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Dana Hoshide"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "209",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "19 194/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/209/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/209/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/hhideo.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/hhideo.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/209/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Hideo Hoshide",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born September 25, 1917, in Tacoma, Washington. Grew up in Tacoma except for living in Japan for several years at age four. Attended the University of Washington in Seattle, majoring in Political Science, Far Eastern Studies, with a minor in journalism. Prior to World War II, worked as sports editor for community newspaper, The Japanese American Courier. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, was removed along with wife to Pinedale Assembly Center, California, and then Tule Lake concentration camp, California. Had a daughter in Tule Lake, and then moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Recruited to work for the U.S. Army's Office of Strategic Services (OSS), was drafted, and trained in India. After the end of the war, was sent to Hiroshima, Japan, to conduct a U.S. government survey studying the effects of the atomic bomb on Japanese citizens. Returned to Seattle in 1946 and was the associate editor for another community newspaper, The Northwest Times. Worked for the Boeing Company postwar while raising a family. Was a founding member of the Seattle Nisei Veterans Committee, working on the group's newsletter for thirty years."
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-csujad-5-186",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "20 195/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-csujad-5-186/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-csujad-5-186/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-186-mezzanine-f636977192-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-186-mezzanine-f636977192-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Letter from Masao Okine to Mr. and Mrs. S. Okine, May 19, 1946 [in Japanese]",
            "description": "A letter from Masao Okine to his parents, Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine. He writes from Japan where he is stationed as a Nisei solder. The letter is mailed via San Francisco by the U. S. Army Postal Service. In the letter, he informs that he has received letters from his sister, Hatsuno, his wife, Ayame, and his brother, Makoto, and met his brother-in-law, Nobuyuki Tanimoto, and everyone is being well. He assumes that they do not have enough coal in larger cities, such as Chicago and Los Angeles, but they would be restored soon. He encloses photographs that he has taken during his visit in Hiroshima. The photographs are not found in the item. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: <a href=\"http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/13862\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\">oki_02_31_001</a>",
            "extent": "3 pages, 6 x 9 inches, handwritten; 1 envelope",
            "links_children": "ddr-csujad-5-186",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "author",
                    "namepart": "Okine, Masao"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Military service -- Postwar occupation of Japan",
                    "id": "199"
                },
                {
                    "term": "World War II -- Military service -- Military Intelligence Service",
                    "id": "91"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Family",
                    "id": "46"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Nisei",
                    "id": "44"
                }
            ],
            "format": "doc",
            "language": [
                "jpn"
            ],
            "contributor": "CSU Dominguez Hills Department of Archives and Special Collections",
            "rights": "nocc",
            "genre": "correspondence",
            "location": "Japan",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-csujad-5-148",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "21 196/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-csujad-5-148/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-csujad-5-148/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-148-mezzanine-da7fbc7e3e-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-csujad-5/ddr-csujad-5-148-mezzanine-da7fbc7e3e-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Letter from Masao Okine to Mr. and Mrs. Okine, June 10, 1946 [in Japanese]",
            "description": "A letter from Masao Okine to his parents, Seiichi and Tomeyo Okine. Masao Okine writes from Japan where he is stationed as a US Army soldier. This letter is mailed via San Francisco by the U.S. Army Postal Service. The letter includes updates, informing of the arrival of his parents' four letters written on May 20, 26, 30, and June 1 respectively and a package including tobaccos and candies, and a plan to visit Hiroshima to meet the relatives and take their pictures to send to his parents. He offers financial support to his parents, enclosing money in the letter. The handwritten notes on the backside of the envelope record the arrival date of the letter, June 15, 1946, and the replied date, June 17, 1946. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: <a href=\"http://cdm16855.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p16855coll4/id/6783\" target=\"_blank\" rel=\"noopener noreferrer\">oki_01_69_001</a>",
            "extent": "3 pages, 7.5 x 10.5 inches, handwritten; 1 envelope",
            "links_children": "ddr-csujad-5-148",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "author",
                    "namepart": "Okine, Masao"
                }
            ],
            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "Identity and values -- Nisei",
                    "id": "44"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Japan -- Post-World War II",
                    "id": "165"
                },
                {
                    "term": "Military service -- Postwar occupation of Japan",
                    "id": "199"
                },
                {
                    "term": "World War II -- Military service -- Military Intelligence Service",
                    "id": "91"
                }
            ],
            "format": "doc",
            "language": [
                "jpn"
            ],
            "contributor": "CSU Dominguez Hills Department of Archives and Special Collections",
            "rights": "nocc",
            "genre": "correspondence",
            "location": "Japan",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1021-4",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "22 197/{'value': 198, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1021-4/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1021-4/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-4-1-mezzanine-b8f1186525-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://ddrstatic.local/media/ddr-densho-1021/ddr-densho-1021-4-1-mezzanine-b8f1186525-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Matsuko Hayashi Interview",
            "description": "Born in 1921 in Parlier in Fresno County, California, Matsuko Hayashi (pseudonym) grew up as the second oldest of the eight children of a first-generation immigrant who had come to the United States as a sixteen years old, and his wife who had come as a \"picture bride.\" They raised grapes on three farms that Matsuko's father and his brother had bought. She remembers her father's affection for the family and his dedication to Buddhism, and how busy her mother was raising children. They hired Mexican laborers and operated their business successfully, winning many blue ribbons for their products at state fairs. Matsuko recalls how the family enjoyed going to camping at Yosemite, and how she went to a Japanese school on Saturdays and Sundays, which she found not effective in teaching her Japanese. As for the American school that she attended on weekdays, she recalls how her teachers were prejudiced against the Japanese. When she went to Japan in 1940, she felt her Japanese classmates were biased against Americans like herself. She and other Nisei at her school in Hiroshima spoke in English, making their Japanese classmate believe that the American students were bad-mouthing their Japanese peers. On August 8, 1945, she was injured and lost consciousness after the bombing, but she survived with the help of her Nisei friend that she knew from a sewing school she had attended in Hiroshima. She lost one of her sisters to the bombing, whom her family was able to identify only because of the white nametag she wore. After losing her Japanese husband to the war, Matsuko came back to the United States in 1947, went to a drapery school and worked in Hollywood as a dressmaker, and was remarried to a Nisei who had been a \"no-no-boy\" in Tule Lake and expressed no concern about the fact that Matsuko is a survivor. As a dedicated Buddhist, Matsuko spent her married life focusing on raising family and working at a nursery, and interacted with other US survivors only occasionally. She feels that being attacked by the bomb was like being hit by tsunami; it was shikata ga nai (It couldn't be helped).",
            "extent": "1:23:29",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1021-4",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 966,
                    "namepart": "Matsuko Hayashi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "interviewer",
                    "namepart": "Naoko Wake"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Jose, California",
            "status": "completed"
        }
    ],
    "query": {
        "query": {
            "query_string": {
                "query": "Hiroshima, Japan",
                "fields": [
                    "id",
                    "model",
                    "links_html",
                    "links_json",
                    "links_img",
                    "links_thumb",
                    "links_children",
                    "status",
                    "public",
                    "title",
                    "description",
                    "contributor",
                    "creators",
                    "facility",
                    "format",
                    "genre",
                    "geography",
                    "label",
                    "language",
                    "location",
                    "persons",
                    "rights",
                    "topics",
                    "image_url",
                    "display_name",
                    "bio",
                    "extent"
                ],
                "analyze_wildcard": false,
                "allow_leading_wildcard": false,
                "default_operator": "AND"
            }
        },
        "aggs": {
            "facility": {
                "nested": {
                    "path": "facility"
                },
                "aggs": {
                    "facility_ids": {
                        "terms": {
                            "field": "facility.id",
                            "size": 1000
                        }
                    }
                }
            },
            "format": {
                "terms": {
                    "field": "format"
                }
            },
            "genre": {
                "terms": {
                    "field": "genre"
                }
            },
            "rights": {
                "terms": {
                    "field": "rights"
                }
            },
            "topics": {
                "nested": {
                    "path": "topics"
                },
                "aggs": {
                    "topics_ids": {
                        "terms": {
                            "field": "topics.id",
                            "size": 1000
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        },
        "_source": [
            "id",
            "model",
            "links_html",
            "links_json",
            "links_img",
            "links_thumb",
            "links_children",
            "status",
            "public",
            "title",
            "description",
            "contributor",
            "creators",
            "facility",
            "format",
            "genre",
            "geography",
            "label",
            "language",
            "location",
            "persons",
            "rights",
            "topics",
            "image_url",
            "display_name",
            "bio",
            "extent"
        ]
    }
}