Information for a specific object.

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{
    "id": "ddr-densho-383",
    "model": "collection",
    "collection_id": "ddr-densho-383",
    "links": {
        "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-383/?format=api",
        "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-383/?format=api",
        "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-383/ddr-densho-383-471-mezzanine-3d47e93569-a.jpg",
        "thumb": "http://ddrmedia.local/media/ddr-densho-383/ddr-densho-383-471-mezzanine-3d47e93569-a.jpg",
        "parent": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho/?format=api",
        "children": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-383/children/?format=api"
    },
    "parent_id": "ddr-densho",
    "organization_id": "ddr-densho",
    "signature_id": "ddr-densho-383-471-mezzanine-3d47e93569",
    "title": "Tokuda Family Collection",
    "description": "The Tokuda Collection consists of three accessions.  Accession 1 of the Tokuda collection contains a photograph album of George Tokuda's from his time as a student at the University of Washington in Seattle. Other subjects in the album include summers working in Alaska, and friends and family growing up in Mukilteo. This collection also includes other photographs of prewar life, including George Tokuda's family and childhood in Mukilteo, his wife Tamako Inouye Tokuda, and the Inouye family. Other subjects include scenes from Camp Harmony and Minidoka, as well as postwar resettlement in Seattle. Accession 2 is comprised primarily of material from Tamako Inouye Tokuda, including a transcription of her diary kept at Camp Harmony and Minidoka, correspondence from friends at other camps as well as personal narratives and poetry written later in life and miscellaneous documents related to the evacuation and from camp.  Accession 3 is two diaries from 1942 from the Tokuda family, one from an unknown author, and another from Tamako (Inouye) Tokuda.  Both diaries reflect on the individual's experiences in the Seattle Area during the forced removal and their first year in camp.",
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        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-383",
            "model": "collection",
            "idpart": "cid",
            "label": "383",
            "api_url": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-383/?format=api",
            "url": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-383/?format=api"
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    ],
    "_fields": [
        "id",
        "record_created",
        "record_lastmod",
        "status",
        "public",
        "title",
        "unitdateinclusive",
        "unitdatebulk",
        "creators",
        "extent",
        "language",
        "contributor",
        "description",
        "physloc",
        "rights",
        "accessrestrict",
        "userrestrict",
        "prefercite",
        "bioghist",
        "scopecontent",
        "relatedmaterial",
        "separatedmaterial",
        "signature_id"
    ],
    "record_created": "2019-01-15T14:35:28",
    "record_lastmod": "2020-10-26T13:23:21",
    "status": "completed",
    "public": "1",
    "unitdateinclusive": "1905-2004",
    "unitdatebulk": "1929-1943",
    "extent": "Accession 1:  1 photograph album (including 350 photographs). 115 loose photographs. 7 35mm film negatives.  Accession 2:  Documents contained in binders and envelopes.\r\nAccession 3: 2 Diaries",
    "language": [
        "eng",
        "jpn"
    ],
    "contributor": "Densho",
    "acqinfo": "Lender: Wendy Tokuda\r\n6452 Ascot Dr\r\nOakland, CA 94611\r\n510-531-1764\r\[email protected]",
    "processinfo": "Signed release form for accessions 1 and 2 added to administrative tab in ddr-densho-383-1. (MM 07/20)",
    "rights": "cc",
    "prefercite": "Courtesy of the Tokuda Family Collection, Densho",
    "bioghist": "George Tsuneyoshi Tokuda was born on May 29, 1912 in Washington state. His parents were Tsunezo (1880-1959) and Sayo Tokuda (1883-1967), both Issei. He had one older brother, Floyd Tokuzo (1905-1971), and a younger sister, Donna Jean Tsune (1922-2001). George grew up in Mukilteo, Washington and graduated from Everett High School in 1929. The Tokuda family moved to Seattle in the 1930s. Both Floyd and George attended the University of Washington and were members of the Japanese Students Club. George graduated with a pharmacy degree in 1932. During his time as a student he also worked at various canneries in Alaska during the summers. After graduating, George worked in various drugstores before WWII. During the war, George was incarcerated at Camp Harmony in Puyallup and then in Minidoka. While at Minidoka he married Tamako Inouye (1920-2013) and the couple had their first child, Floyd Tokuda, in 1945. After the war, the couple returned to Seattle where George opened his own drugstore.\r\n\r\nGeorge Tokuda’s wife, Tamako Inouye, was born in 1920 in Washington state. Her parents were Kameki (born 1886) and Toku Komatsu Inouye (1887-1966), both Issei. Her siblings were: Ted Tetsumi (1912-1983), Tomiko (1922-2017), Kimiko (1925-1927), Kiichiro Kibo (1927-1999), and Michiko (1930-1989). Tamako grew up in Seattle, where her father opened a men’s clothing store in the 1920s. Tamako attended the University of Washington and graduated in 1942. During her time as a University of Washington student she was a member and officer of the women’s student organization Fuyo-Kai, holding the position of Secretary and then President of Fuyo-Kai. During the war, she was incarcerated at Camp Harmony in Puyallup and then in Minidoka, where she and George Tokuda were married.",
    "scopecontent": "Accession 1 of the Tokuda collection consists of one album belonging to George Tokuda and various other photographs from prewar to post-war resettlement. The album contains photographs from his time as student at the University of Washington in Seattle and summers spent in Alaska working at various canneries as well as photographs of family and friends from Mukilteo, where Tokuda grew up.  Other photographs from this collection include George Tokuda’s childhood in Mukilteo, as a student at the University of Washington, and working at a drugstore before WWII as well as the childhood of George Tokuda’s wife, Tamako Inouye Tokuda, growing up in Seattle and her kabuki performances at the Nippon Kan Theatre. Other topics include: life in Camp Harmony and Minidoka, and George and Tamako Tokuda during postwar resettlement in Seattle.  Accession 2 consists of a collection of material from Tamako Inouye Tokuda written while at Camp Harmony and Minidoka as well as later material written about her experiences before being interned and during her time in camp. Accession 3 is two diaries from 1942 both diaries reflect on the individual's experiences in the Seattle Area during the forced removal and their first year in camp.",
    "download_large": "ddr-densho-383-471-mezzanine-3d47e93569-a.jpg"
}