Frank Emi Interview II Segment 2

Career plans before World War II; reaction to the bombing of Pearl Harbor (ddr-densho-122-20-1) - 00:04:13
Memories of the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, curfew (ddr-densho-122-20-2) - 00:03:06
Preparing for mass removal; memories of Heart Mountain concentration camp, Wyoming (ddr-densho-122-20-3) - 00:05:18
(ddr-densho-122-20-4) - 00:01:38
Discussion of the leave clearance questionnaire: "I felt so strongly that these questions were very unfair and stupid" (ddr-densho-122-20-5) - 00:05:24
Beginnings of the Fair Play Committee (ddr-densho-122-20-6) - 00:03:13
Reaction to the government's institution of the military draft, holding a rally (ddr-densho-122-20-7) - 00:05:29
Ineligible for the draft, yet choosing to resist on principle (ddr-densho-122-20-8) - 00:04:28
Recalling an interrogation by the camp project director (ddr-densho-122-20-9) - 00:03:31
Bolstered by public support from James Omura, editor of the <i>Rocky Shimpo</i> (ddr-densho-122-20-10) - 00:02:15
Description of the purpose of the Fair Play Committee (ddr-densho-122-20-11) - 00:05:00
Discussion of the bulletins issues by the Fair Play Committee and "the one line that got us indicted" (ddr-densho-122-20-12) - 00:06:27
Thoughts on Ben Kuroki's visit to Heart Mountain (ddr-densho-122-20-13) - 00:04:38
The trustworthiness of the members of the Fair Play Committee (ddr-densho-122-20-14) - 00:03:54
Arrest by the FBI, leaving family and being taken to jail (ddr-densho-122-20-15) - 00:04:52
Standing trial for resisting the draft (ddr-densho-122-20-16) - 00:05:54
Receiving a "guilty" verdict and filing an appeal (ddr-densho-122-20-17) - 00:03:07
Serving time in the Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary (ddr-densho-122-20-18) - 00:04:01
Passing time in prison, talking with Issei Guntaro Kubota (ddr-densho-122-20-19) - 00:04:01
Learning that conviction had been reversed: "it was a very happy occasion" (ddr-densho-122-20-20) - 00:05:19
Life after World War II: losing touch with other Fair Play Committee leaders, working for the post office, teaching judo (ddr-densho-122-20-21) - 00:03:49
Reflections on decision to resist the draft: "the injustice of the whole thing was so great, unfair" (ddr-densho-122-20-22) - 00:03:53
Long-term affects of wartime resistance; reaction of community members (ddr-densho-122-20-23) - 00:05:32
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ddr-densho-122-20-2 (Legacy UID: denshovh-efrank-03-0002)

Memories of the aftermath of Pearl Harbor, curfew

This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, Conscience and the Constitution, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.

00:03:06 — Segment 2 of 23

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January 30, 1998

Frank Abe Collection

Frank Abe Collection

Courtesy of Frank Abe

ddr-densho-122-20

Frank Emi

Frank Emi Interview II

01:39:02 — 23 segments

January 30, 1998

Los Angeles, California

Nisei male. Born September 23, 1916, in Los Angeles, California. Attended Los Angeles City College for one year before leaving to run the family produce business. Married and had a daughter before being removed to Pomona Assembly Center, California, and Heart Mountain concentration camp, Wyoming. The leader of Heart Mountain's Fair Play Committee, was convicted of resisting the draft, and was imprisoned for eighteen months at Leavenworth, Kansas. After leaving prison, worked for the U.S. post office and the California state unemployment office. Mr. Emi practiced judo as a young person before the war, and postwar, taught at the Hollywood Judo Dojo. Mr. Emi passed away in December 2010.

(This interview was conducted by filmmaker Frank Abe for his 2000 documentary, Conscience and the Constitution, about the World War II resisters of conscience at the Heart Mountain incarceration camp. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)

Frank Abe, interviewer; Frank Chin, interviewer

Frank Abe Collection

Courtesy of Frank Abe

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