Gus J. Solomon Interview Segment 1

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ddr-densho-1012-10-1 (Legacy UID: denshovh-sgus-01-0001)

Getting involved with Min Yasui's case as an ACLU lawyer (audio only)

This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film Unfinished Business.

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

00:05:32 — Segment 1 of 3

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October 14, 1983

Steven Okazaki Collection

Steven Okazaki Collection

ddr-densho-1012-10

Gus J. Solomon

Gus J. Solomon Interview

00:14:08 — 3 segments

October 14, 1983

Portland, Oregon

Gus J. Solomon, U.S. federal district judge from Portland, Oregon, was involved in Min Yasui's case on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union. In 1942, Min Yasui deliberately defied the curfew imposed upon Japanese Americans in Portland, Oregon, and was arrested. His case was tried, and he was sentenced to one year in prison and given a $5000 fine. The appeal eventually reached the Supreme Court, which ruled that the government did have the authority to restrict the lives of civilian citizens during wartime. Yasui's fine was removed and he was released to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. In the 1980s, his case was reopened under writ of error coram nobis, and 1986 his conviction was overturned by the Oregon federal court.

(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film Unfinished Business.

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)

Steven Okazaki Collection

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