Harry Ueno Interview Segment 5

Family background: growing up in Hawaii, going to Japan as a child (ddr-densho-1002-7-1) - 00:09:04
Returning to the United States in 1923, working in a lumber mill (ddr-densho-1002-7-2) - 00:02:23
Getting married, selling produce in a market in Los Angeles, California (ddr-densho-1002-7-3) - 00:04:51
Encountering prejudice after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, thoughts on anti-Japanese propaganda (ddr-densho-1002-7-4) - 00:06:59
Gathering in a local pool hall to discuss the bombing of Pearl Harbor (ddr-densho-1002-7-5) - 00:04:34
Having children before the war; Christmas 1941, the aftermath of the bombing of Pearl Harbor (ddr-densho-1002-7-6) - 00:06:09
Being questioned by the FBI following the bombing of Pearl Harbor (ddr-densho-1002-7-7) - 00:07:36
Selling possessions prior to mass removal; deciding what to bring (ddr-densho-1002-7-8) - 00:04:48
The day of mass removal: traveling to Manzanar, California, by bus (ddr-densho-1002-7-9) - 00:03:11
First impressions of Manzanar concentration camp, California: dust and bad food (ddr-densho-1002-7-10) - 00:05:24
Working in camp: clearing sagebrush, then applying to work in mess hall (ddr-densho-1002-7-11) - 00:01:58
Jobs in camp (ddr-densho-1002-7-12) - 00:03:51
Working in the camp mess hall: making do when certain foods are in short supply (ddr-densho-1002-7-13) - 00:05:22
Working to build a pond for the camp residents to enjoy while waiting in line for the mess hall (ddr-densho-1002-7-14) - 00:05:50
Investigating sugar shortages while working in a camp mess hall (ddr-densho-1002-7-15) - 00:04:50
Organizing the mess hall union: complaining to the camp administration about food shortages (ddr-densho-1002-7-16) - 00:07:54
Accusing the camp administration of covering up knowledge of food shortages in camp (ddr-densho-1002-7-17) - 00:09:41
Receiving clothing from camp administration (ddr-densho-1002-7-18) - 00:04:33
Description of Fred Tayama, a suspected "informer" for the camp administration (ddr-densho-1002-7-19) - 00:03:31
Discussion of accused "informers" for the camp administration (ddr-densho-1002-7-20) - 00:05:58
Being accused of assaulting a suspected camp "informer" (ddr-densho-1002-7-21) - 00:09:47
Held inside the camp jail after being accused of assaulting a suspected camp "informer" (ddr-densho-1002-7-22) - 00:06:27
Involvement in the Manzanar "riot": held in jail while demonstrators protested (ddr-densho-1002-7-23) - 00:09:16
Taken to jail outside the camp (ddr-densho-1002-7-24) - 00:08:49
Being detained in the Lone Pine jail without a hearing (ddr-densho-1002-7-25) - 00:10:36
Journey by train through the Mojave Desert (ddr-densho-1002-7-26) - 00:03:13
Memories of the Moab, Utah, citizen isolation center: anger over lack of a hearing, censored mail (ddr-densho-1002-7-27) - 00:06:27
A terrible truck ride to Leupp, Arizona, a citizen isolation center (ddr-densho-1002-7-28) - 00:10:04
Family's experiences in Manzanar (ddr-densho-1002-7-29) - 00:02:26
Memories of Leupp, Arizona: secretly listening to news of the war on a shortwave radio (ddr-densho-1002-7-30) - 00:04:43
Memories of Leupp, Arizona: the registration period (ddr-densho-1002-7-31) - 00:04:33
Answering "no-no" on the so-called "loyalty questionnaire," and being taken to the stockade in Tule Lake concentration camp (ddr-densho-1002-7-32) - 00:06:17
Illicitly listening to a shortwave radio in camp; dealings with Raymond Best, camp director (ddr-densho-1002-7-33) - 00:09:50
Reuniting with wife and children in Tule Lake; thoughts on the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (ddr-densho-1002-7-34) - 00:09:18
Thoughts on poor condition of Tule Lake concentration camp, California (ddr-densho-1002-7-35) - 00:07:00
Deciding to stay out of camp politics at Tule Lake (ddr-densho-1002-7-36) - 00:03:06
Description of organization of mess hall workers in Manzanar (ddr-densho-1002-7-37) - 00:05:13
Thoughts on postwar life, feelings about the U.S. government: "I forgive them" (ddr-densho-1002-7-38) - 00:06:50
Postwar life: working as a farmer in California (ddr-densho-1002-7-39) - 00:02:37
Reflections; inaccuracies in the movie "Farewell to Manzanar" (ddr-densho-1002-7-40) - 00:03:50
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ddr-densho-1002-7-5 (Legacy UID: denshovh-uharry-01-0005)

Gathering in a local pool hall to discuss the bombing of Pearl Harbor

This interview was conducted by sisters Emiko and Chizuko Omori for their 1999 documentary, Rabbit in the Moon, about the Japanese American resisters of conscience in the World War II incarceration camps. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.

00:04:34 — Segment 5 of 40

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February 18, 1994

Emiko and Chizuko Omori Collection

Emiko and Chizuko Omori Collection

Courtesy of Emiko and Chizuko Omori

ddr-densho-1002-7

Harry Ueno

Harry Ueno Interview

03:58:49 — 40 segments

February 18, 1994

San Mateo, California

Nisei male. Born April 14, 1907, in Pauilo, Hawaii. Lived in Japan from 1915 to 1923, and settled on the mainland upon his return to the United States. Was married in 1930, and was removed along with family to Manzanar concentration camp, California, during World War II. While in Manzanar, organized the Mess Hall Workers Union. Accused of beating up a suspected government informant and was placed in jail, sparking the so-called "Manzanar Riot." Was moved to various jails and the Citizen Isolation Centers Leupp, Arizona, and Moab, Utah, before being reunited with his family in Tule Lake Segregation Center. After release from camp, moved to the Santa Clara Valley, raised three children, and became a farmer. Mr. Ueno passed away on December 14, 2004.

(This interview was conducted by sisters Emiko and Chizuko Omori for their 1999 documentary, Rabbit in the Moon, about the Japanese American resisters of conscience in the World War II incarceration camps. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues surrounding the resistance movement itself.)

Emiko Omori, interviewer; Emiko Omori and Witt Mons, videographer

Emiko and Chizuko Omori Collection

Courtesy of Emiko and Chizuko Omori

API