Ryo Imamura Segment 3

Role of the Berkeley Buddhist Temple in providing housing and serving the community during the postwar resettlement period (ddr-densho-1000-27-1) - 00:03:10
Parents' backgrounds, a family history revolving around the Buddhist ministry (ddr-densho-1000-27-2) - 00:04:41
Issei values, community service and compassion: grandparents' ministry, caring for the children of Issei farm laborers (ddr-densho-1000-27-3) - 00:06:41
Contrasting role of prewar Buddhist churches with those of today (ddr-densho-1000-27-4) - 00:07:14
Grandfather's role as Jodo Shin Buddhist minister to early plantation laborers in Hawaii (ddr-densho-1000-27-5) - 00:03:24
Role of early Buddhist ministers as community leaders, advocating social justice (ddr-densho-1000-27-6) - 00:04:53
Philosophy and ideology of Jodo Shinshu Buddhist sect, "...[T]o see others as enlightened" (ddr-densho-1000-27-7) - 00:04:17
Similarities and differences between Jodo Shinshu Buddhism and Judeo-Christianity (ddr-densho-1000-27-8) - 00:04:17
Some of the unique characteristics of Japanese American Buddhist churches (ddr-densho-1000-27-9) - 00:06:32
Similarities and differences between Jodo Shinshu Buddhism and Judeo-Christianity; Japanese American Buddhists' values: understated, anonymous service (ddr-densho-1000-27-10) - 00:07:05
Evolution and adaptation within the Japanese American Buddhist Church: the challenge of introducing new ideas and practices into existing traditions and rituals (ddr-densho-1000-27-11) - 00:08:08
Evolution and adaptation within the Japanese American Buddhist Church: the challenge of introducing new ideas and practices into existing traditions and rituals (ddr-densho-1000-27-12) - 00:04:05
The emergence of two distinct groups within the Buddhist church: traditional and progressive (ddr-densho-1000-27-13) - 00:04:48
Discussion of increasing Caucasian membership in Buddhist churches (ddr-densho-1000-27-14) - 00:04:38
Reflecting on the need for a broader, more inclusive vision of Buddhism, father's influence (ddr-densho-1000-27-15) - 00:04:21
Choosing the path of Buddhist priesthood during the '60s antiwar movement (ddr-densho-1000-27-16) - 00:05:00
Leading an antiwar demonstration on a Buddhist temple in Hawaii (ddr-densho-1000-27-17) - 00:03:13
Reconciling wartime killing by Buddhist 442nd Regimental Combat Team soldiers with Buddhism's doctrine of nonviolence (ddr-densho-1000-27-18) - 00:02:37
Buddhist philosophy of non-attachment to "forms": Buddhist 442nd soldiers' acceptance of a Christian chaplain (ddr-densho-1000-27-19) - 00:02:51
Supporting the plight of the United Farm Workers, to the dismay of Japanese American farmers (ddr-densho-1000-27-20) - 00:04:35
Discussion of Buddhist teachings as applied to contemporary political issues, e.g., abortion (ddr-densho-1000-27-21) - 00:04:26
Analyzing the relationship between Buddhism and Western psychotherapies (ddr-densho-1000-27-22) - 00:10:25
Describing Morita and Naikan therapies, adjuncts of Zen and Jodo Shin Buddhism (ddr-densho-1000-27-23) - 00:03:03
Describing Morita and Naikan therapies, adjuncts of Zen and Jodo Shin Buddhism (ddr-densho-1000-27-24) - 00:03:57
Analyzing the relationship between Buddhism and Western psychotherapies (ddr-densho-1000-27-25) - 00:07:52
Learning how to communicate about "emotions," as an "Asian male therapist" (ddr-densho-1000-27-26) - 00:07:45
The problem with applying Western psychological therapy without regard to culture (ddr-densho-1000-27-27) - 00:04:43
How Buddhist beliefs impact individual viewpoint and perception of the incarceration experience (ddr-densho-1000-27-28) - 00:03:58
A Buddhist's view of the redress movement (ddr-densho-1000-27-29) - 00:02:02
Discussion of prewar discrimination against Buddhists and social pressures to convert to Christianity (ddr-densho-1000-27-30) - 00:03:05
Present day relations between Japanese American Christian community and Japanese American Buddhist community (ddr-densho-1000-27-31) - 00:02:40
(ddr-densho-1000-27-32) - 00:03:21
Issues of self-image, cultural adaptation, and survival mechanisms as a racial minority (ddr-densho-1000-27-33) - 00:08:22
Issues of self-image, cultural adaptation, and survival mechanisms as a racial minority (ddr-densho-1000-27-34) - 00:03:08
(ddr-densho-1000-27-35) - 00:07:06
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ddr-densho-1000-27-3 (Legacy UID: denshovh-iryo-01-0003)

Issei values, community service and compassion: grandparents' ministry, caring for the children of Issei farm laborers

00:06:41 — Segment 3 of 35

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August 3, 1999

Densho Visual History Collection

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

ddr-densho-1000-27

Ryo Imamura

Ryo Imamura Interview

02:52:23 — 35 segments

August 3, 1999

Olympia, Washington

Sansei male, born 1944 in the Gila River concentration camp, Arizona. His father was the late Rev. Kanmo Imamura, a former Bishop of Hawaii and a minister for the Hawaii Kyodan and the Buddhist Churches of America (BCA). His mother Jane Imamura composed many of the children's gathas sung in the Dharma Schools. Both of his grandfathers were Issei ministers, who were instrumental in bringing Jodo Shin Buddhism to America at the beginning of the century. His paternal grandfather was Bishop Yemyo Imamura of the Hawaii Kyodan. And his maternal grandfather was Rev. Issei Matsuura of the Buddhist Churches of America. He received a Bachelor's degree in Mathematics from the University of California at Berkeley, a Master's degree in Counseling from the San Francisco State University, and a Doctorate degree in Counseling Psychology from the University of San Francisco. He received the tokudo and kyoshi ordinations in Kyoto in 1971-2 after which he was a minister for the Hawaii Kyodan and director of the Buddhist Study Center for 4 years and a BCA minister for 11 years. Before moving to Washington in 1988, he was a psychotherapist in California and co-founder of the East-West Counseling Center. Currently he is a professor of Psychology at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. The focus of his teaching and research is East-West Psychology with an emphasis on Buddhist thought and practice.

Stephen Fugita, interviewer; Erin Kimura, interviewer; Steve Hamada, videographer

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

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