Tosh Yasutake Interview Segment 4

Born in Seattle, Washington, one of four siblings (ddr-densho-1000-138-1) - 00:05:49
Attending the University of Washington until the bombing of Pearl Harbor: dealing with the uncertainty (ddr-densho-1000-138-2) - 00:02:52
Memories of FBI raid on family home on December 7, 1941 (ddr-densho-1000-138-3) - 00:04:51
First impressions of the Puyallup Assembly Center: "it was like going to an army camp" (ddr-densho-1000-138-4) - 00:07:59
Volunteering to move early to Minidoka to help prepare the camp for the other Japanese Americans (ddr-densho-1000-138-5) - 00:02:38
Leaving camp temporarily to help local farmers with beet topping work (ddr-densho-1000-138-6) - 00:06:54
Gaining valuable experience working as a male attendant in the camp hospital (ddr-densho-1000-138-7) - 00:05:13
Deciding to volunteer for the army in hopes that father would be released; feeling conflicted upon being placed in a segregated unit (ddr-densho-1000-138-8) - 00:09:21
Arranging a trip out of camp to visit father in Lordsburg, New Mexico before induction into the army (ddr-densho-1000-138-9) - 00:07:20
Volunteering on the last possible day, early memories of basic training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi (ddr-densho-1000-138-10) - 00:07:50
First encounter with Nisei from Hawaii: overcoming the language difficulties (ddr-densho-1000-138-11) - 00:05:51
Training as a medic (ddr-densho-1000-138-12) - 00:02:25
Description of company structure, medic's role and the aid stations (ddr-densho-1000-138-13) - 00:04:17
Minimal weapons training, never having to use firearms in battle (ddr-densho-1000-138-14) - 00:02:51
Close relationships with other medics (ddr-densho-1000-138-15) - 00:06:22
Feeling uncomfortable when witnessing segregation in the South (ddr-densho-1000-138-16) - 00:03:18
Landing in Europe; setting up headquarters station and aid stations as moved from place to place (ddr-densho-1000-138-17) - 00:09:41
Interactions with members of the 100th Battalion, who were much more battle experienced (ddr-densho-1000-138-18) - 00:08:23
Working as a medic at the battalion aid station: "very chaotic" (ddr-densho-1000-138-19) - 00:04:08
Treating injuries from the front lines, replacing a medic who became "shell-shocked" (ddr-densho-1000-138-20) - 00:04:15
Dangerous job of medics, decision to remove all outward indications of medic status (ddr-densho-1000-138-21) - 00:08:15
Attending reunions of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team members (ddr-densho-1000-138-22) - 00:04:11
Getting hit by shrapnel in France: "a million dollar wound" (ddr-densho-1000-138-23) - 00:07:44
Receiving the Bronze Star (ddr-densho-1000-138-24) - 00:01:58
Memories of a key battle, the breaking of the Gothic Line (ddr-densho-1000-138-25) - 00:07:52
Thoughts on the camaraderie between fellow soldiers, keeping in contact many years after the war (ddr-densho-1000-138-26) - 00:04:54
In retrospect, feeling more positive about the fact that the 442nd Regimental Combat Team was a segregated unit (ddr-densho-1000-138-27) - 00:02:33
Thoughts on postwar prejudice; being discharged in 1945 (ddr-densho-1000-138-28) - 00:04:25
Staying in New York City after the war, meeting future wife, and passing civil service exam (ddr-densho-1000-138-29) - 00:11:25
Returning to Seattle and attending the University of Washington (ddr-densho-1000-138-30) - 00:05:25
Pursuing a cross country relationship, a unique wedding experience (ddr-densho-1000-138-31) - 00:07:48
Working in a customer service job, then finding work with the Fish and Wildlife Service (ddr-densho-1000-138-32) - 00:05:45
Raising a family, experiencing discrimination when trying to buy a home in Bothell, Washington (ddr-densho-1000-138-33) - 00:11:55
Very little discussion with children about discrimination, incarceration experience (ddr-densho-1000-138-34) - 00:03:50
Notable work in the field of fish pathology (ddr-densho-1000-138-35) - 00:05:03
Comical experiences involving the Japanese language later in life (ddr-densho-1000-138-36) - 00:06:39
Earning a Ph.D from the University of Tokyo (ddr-densho-1000-138-37) - 00:09:42
Experiences living in Japan; observing the differences between Japanese and Japanese American (ddr-densho-1000-138-38) - 00:03:49
Discovering that family home in Seattle had been donated to a museum in Japan, and physically relocated there (ddr-densho-1000-138-39) - 00:08:15
Visiting the relocated family home in Japan with mother and brothers, recalling old times (ddr-densho-1000-138-40) - 00:04:01
Reflections on the passage of the redress legislation: "I was so surprised" (ddr-densho-1000-138-41) - 00:02:52
Thoughts on the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks (ddr-densho-1000-138-42) - 00:03:27
Free to use This object is offered under a Creative Commons license. You are free to use it for any non-commercial purpose as long as you properly cite it, and if you share what you have created.

Learn more...

ddr-densho-1000-138-4 (Legacy UID: denshovh-ytosh-01-0004)

First impressions of the Puyallup Assembly Center: "it was like going to an army camp"

William Toshio Yasutake was interviewed together with his sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada and surviving brother, Joseph Yasutake, in group sessions on October 8-9, 2002. He was interviewed individually on November 14, 2002.

Before being contacted by Densho, the Yasutake siblings had planned to conduct their own family history interviews. Individually and jointly, they and other family members had written and gathered material documenting their family history. They shared much of this with me to assist with research and preparation for the Densho interview. Mitsuye's daughter Jeni had coordinated much of the family history work. Jeni participated as a secondary interviewer during the group sessions, October 8-9, 2002.

The group interview sessions were conducted in Seattle at the home of Tom Ikeda, executive director of Densho. The oldest Yasutake sibling, Reverend Seiichi Michael Yasutake, had passed away less than a year before the Densho interviewing, in December, 2001. The remaining siblings emphasized that his absence left a gap in their discussion of family history. In addition to Jeni Yamada and videographers Dana Hoshide and John Pai, also present during some portions of the group interview were Tom Ikeda, and Mitsuye Yamada's son Kai Yamada.

00:07:59 — Segment 4 of 42

Previous segment Next segment

November 14, 2002

Densho Visual History Collection

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

ddr-densho-1000-138

Tosh Yasutake

Tosh Yasutake Interview

04:04:06 — 42 segments

November 14, 2002

Seattle, Washington

Nisei male. Born 1922 in Seattle, WA. Father employed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as interpreter for twenty years, until separated from family on December 7, 1941 and interned as an enemy alien. Graduated 1941, Cleveland High School, and attended University of Washington before being removed from Seattle with mother, sister and two brothers in 1942. Incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Worked as hospital attendant and laboratory technician in Minidoka. While incarcerated in Minidoka, volunteered for U.S. Army, March, 1943. Allowed to travel from Minidoka, with sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada, to visit their father, Jack Kaichiro Yasutake, incarcerated at U.S. Department of Justice internment camp in Lordsburg, NM.

After basic training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, served in Europe in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team as a medic assigned to Company I, 2nd Platoon. Wounded during combat in southern France, October, 1944. Awarded Bronze Star. After recovery, assigned as a medic to Anti-tank Company, 1st platoon. December, 1945 discharged from the army. After visiting parents and younger brother in Cincinnati and living briefly in New York City, returned to Seattle. Married. Received B.A., Zoology, from University of Washington. Began career in research on fish pathology. Had four children.

Received Ph.D in Fish Pathology from the University of Tokyo. Retired in 1988 as Research Histologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, after 36 years. Continues to serve as a Senior Scientist Emeritus in a volunteer capacity. Dr. W.T. Yasutake is the author of numerous articles published in scholarly journals, and the book, Microscopic Anatomy of Salmonids. He has received awards and recognition for his pioneering and outstanding contributions to his professional field.

(William Toshio Yasutake was interviewed together with his sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada and surviving brother, Joseph Yasutake, in group sessions on October 8-9, 2002. He was interviewed individually on November 14, 2002.

Before being contacted by Densho, the Yasutake siblings had planned to conduct their own family history interviews. Individually and jointly, they and other family members had written and gathered material documenting their family history. They shared much of this with me to assist with research and preparation for the Densho interview. Mitsuye's daughter Jeni had coordinated much of the family history work. Jeni participated as a secondary interviewer during the group sessions, October 8-9, 2002.

The group interview sessions were conducted in Seattle at the home of Tom Ikeda, executive director of Densho. The oldest Yasutake sibling, Reverend Seiichi Michael Yasutake, had passed away less than a year before the Densho interviewing, in December, 2001. The remaining siblings emphasized that his absence left a gap in their discussion of family history. In addition to Jeni Yamada and videographers Dana Hoshide and John Pai, also present during some portions of the group interview were Tom Ikeda, and Mitsuye Yamada's son Kai Yamada.)

Alice Ito, interviewer; Tom Ikeda, interviewer; Dana Hoshide, videographer

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

API