Densho Collection

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ddr-densho-35

The Densho collection consists of historic photographs of early Seattle and surrounding areas, as well as current photographs of historical sites and community events. This collection includes photographs of Tule Lake, California; Minidoka, Idaho; the Nisei veterans Memorial Day service in Seattle, Washington, and photos of the Golden Potlatch festival in Seattle, Washington, c. 1911. Also included in this collection are a series of newspaper articles from The Crisis, a publication founded by W.E.B. DuBois in 1910, The Chicago Defender, the first African American newspaper to have a circulation over 100,000, and The Northwest Enterprise, an African American newspaper based in Seattle, Washington, published from 1920-1956.

c.1900-1999

c.1900-1999

photographic prints; documents

Densho

Courtesy of Densho

Copyright restricted
Copyright restricted

339 Objects

Memorial plaque (ddr-densho-35-1)
img Memorial plaque (ddr-densho-35-1)
This plaque is part of a monument erected in 1979 by the JACL and California State Department of Parks and Recreation to commemorate the Tule Lake concentration camp.
Monument (ddr-densho-35-2)
img Monument (ddr-densho-35-2)
In 1979, to commemorate the Tule Lake concentration camp, the Japanese American Citizens League and the California State Department of Parks and Recreation erected this monument, located outside the stockade area.
Guard tower foundation (?) (ddr-densho-35-3)
img Guard tower foundation (?) (ddr-densho-35-3)
This foundation remnant, presumably from a guard tower, is located outside the barbed-wire fence surrounding the stockade.
Exterior of barracks and Castle Rock (ddr-densho-35-4)
img Exterior of barracks and Castle Rock (ddr-densho-35-4)
These barracks are now on the property of a Tule Lake farmer. A rock formation that the Japanese Americans called "Castle Rock" can be seen in the background. After obtaining permission to go through the gates, camp inmates could climb to the top of the formation.
Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-5)
img Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-5)
These barracks housed Japanese Americans during World War II. There were approximately twelve barracks to a block and six apartments per barracks. Each apartment was 100 x 20 feet and housed one family. The exterior of these barracks have remained virtually untouched since World War II.
Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-6)
img Exterior of barracks (ddr-densho-35-6)
Local farmers now own a few barracks from the Tule Lake concentration camp. The buildings are used for storage, have been made into homes and garages, or are abandoned, like this one. The exterior of the barracks have remained almost untouched since World War II.

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