California Polytechnic State Smith Family Papers on World War II

CSU Japanese American History Digitization Project
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ddr-csujad-21

Papers of two generations of the Smith family, Dr. Frank Herron Smith and his son Dr. Morris Eugene “Gene” Smith, including vintage broadsides and government reports on the incarceration of Japanese Americans during World War II and correspondence from the elder Smith to government officials advocating for improved treatment and safety for returning incarcerees.

See complete finding aid at: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/kt2p30242w/

1936-2005

1942-1946

Special Collections and Archives<br />Robert E. Kennedy Library<br />California Polytechnic State University<br />1 Grand Ave, Bldg. 35<br />San Luis Obispo, California 93407<br />Phone: (805) 756-5760<br />URL: http://lib.calpoly.edu/search-and-find/coll

Special Collections and Archives, Robert E. Kennedy Library, California Polytechnic State University

Smith Family Papers on World War II, Special Collections, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Calif.

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7 Objects

Letter from Frank Herron Smith to J. H. Peiper, Federal Bureau of Investigation, May 4, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-1)
doc Letter from Frank Herron Smith to J. H. Peiper, Federal Bureau of Investigation, May 4, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-1)
Smith urges FBI action be taken to stop injustices done to Japanese American citizens during World War II. Letter mentions correspondence from a Japanese pastor in Livingston, California, near Modesto and Merced, describing "no less than eight shooting incidents in which night-riders have shot into the homes of our church members." Smith also describes shooting and ...
Letter from Frank Herron Smith to President Harry S. Truman, May 4, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-2)
doc Letter from Frank Herron Smith to President Harry S. Truman, May 4, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-2)
Smith urges Truman to ask "Edgar J. Hoover and his organization" to help control "the arsonists and night-riders who are terrorizing the few Japanese Americans who have returned to the West Coast." Smith states that approximately 60,000 of the "110,000" people who were "evacuated" seek to return to their homes, under pressure from the War Relocation ...
Letter from Frank Herron Smith to C. I. O. Reporter, Station KYA, San Francisco, May 5, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-3)
doc Letter from Frank Herron Smith to C. I. O. Reporter, Station KYA, San Francisco, May 5, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-3)
Letter to popular local radio reporter requests that he speak out against injustices perpetrated against Japanese American citizens during World War II. Smith notes his responsibility for "the care of our 37 Japanese churches," states that he is concerned that church members are not being allowed to work in canneries in Sacramento by the union, and ...
Letter from Francis Biddle, Attorney General of the United States, to Frank Herron Smith, May 8, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-4)
doc Letter from Francis Biddle, Attorney General of the United States, to Frank Herron Smith, May 8, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-4)
Biddle's response to Smith's letter to Harry Truman requesting that J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI become involved in stopping the arson and shootings perpetrated against Japanese Americans (see Letter from Frank Herron Smith to President Harry S. Truman, May 4, 1945) informs Smith that unless a federal law is violated, he can not be involved. ...
Letter from Earl Warren, Governor of California, to Frank Herron Smith May 29, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-5)
doc Letter from Earl Warren, Governor of California, to Frank Herron Smith May 29, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-5)
Response to Smith's letter detailing incidents against Japanese Americans returning to California informs Smith that law enforcement is a local responsibility, and that Warren has "personally urged every Mayor and every principal law enforcement officer in the state to support the government and do his full duty in this situation." Warren states that he is aware ...
Letter from Francis Biddle, Attorney General of the United States, to Frank Herron Smith, May 30, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-6)
doc Letter from Francis Biddle, Attorney General of the United States, to Frank Herron Smith, May 30, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-6)
Response to information from Smith states that, unless a federal law is violated, Biddle can not be involved, but that this "serious" matter "should be taken up directly with the Governor of California." See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: 065-1-a-01-01-06
Letter from Tom C. Clark,  Assistant Attorney General of the United States, to Frank Herron Smith, May 31, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-7)
doc Letter from Tom C. Clark, Assistant Attorney General of the United States, to Frank Herron Smith, May 31, 1945 (ddr-csujad-21-7)
Referencing Clark's May 4, 1945 letter to Harry Truman regarding violence against Japanese Americans on the West Coast, Clark informs Smith that unless a federal law is violated, the FBI can not be involved. See related Letter from Frank Herron Smith to President Harry S. Truman, May 4, 1945. See this object in the California State ...
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