Small business

Japanese American businesses, such as groceries, fish shops, laundries, barbershops, public bathhouses, restaurants, drugstores, and dry goods stores, sprang up in communities along the West Coast. Women and children were vitally important to these "mom and pop" enterprises, as their free labor allowed the family to survive and even prosper during lean times.

Industry and employment (392)
Small business (335)

335 items
Tomio Moriguchi Interview IV Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-62-5)
vh Tomio Moriguchi Interview IV Segment 5 (ddr-densho-1000-62-5)
Various roles siblings play in running Uwajimaya, Inc.

Filmed on location.

Tomio Moriguchi Interview IV Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1000-62-2)
vh Tomio Moriguchi Interview IV Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1000-62-2)
The introduction of pan-Asian products at Uwajimaya

Filmed on location.

Tomio Moriguchi Interview IV Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-62-7)
vh Tomio Moriguchi Interview IV Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-62-7)
The family's decision to expand and move the store

Filmed on location.

George Iseri Interview Segment 8 (ddr-one-7-40-8)
vh George Iseri Interview Segment 8 (ddr-one-7-40-8)
Helping father make grocery deliveries

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

George Azumano Interview Segment 23 (ddr-one-7-32-23)
vh George Azumano Interview Segment 23 (ddr-one-7-32-23)
Starting a travel agency

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

API