Religion

Japanese Americans used religion as one way to handle the stress of the incarceration experience. Church served as both a spiritual comfort and a place for community gatherings. On Sundays, Buddhist and Christian services and Sunday schools were held in the recreation halls. State Shintoism was another popular religion within the Japanese American community but was banned by the U.S. government on the grounds that it included "Emperor worship." Church services initially were given in both Japanese and English, but camp authorities later banned the use of Japanese at all group gatherings (although translation into Japanese was later permitted at some religious services).

Religion (163)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Paul M. Nagano

163 items
Group photograph outside the Manzanar Buddhist Church (ddr-manz-4-21)
img Group photograph outside the Manzanar Buddhist Church (ddr-manz-4-21)
Caption in album: "Ohiganye gathering - Sept-42 / Board of Directors and Sunday School Teachers."
George Nakata Interview Segment 25 (ddr-one-7-29-25)
vh George Nakata Interview Segment 25 (ddr-one-7-29-25)
Establishment of churches in camp

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru and Eva Koyama (ddr-one-5-33)
Envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, and daughter, Eva Koyama. Postmarked Sep 21, 1942. To the left of the postmark is “9/26/42” written in red pencil. On the left side of the envelope is a purple "Censored" stamp. The left edge of the envelope is torn so that ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-72)
Envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at the Santa Fe Detention Station from his wife, Teru Koyama, at Minidoka. Postmarked Oct 4, 1943. In the upper right corner “Internee of War/Free Mail” is written in place of a stamp. The numbers “10-8-43” are written along the top of the envelope in red pencil. Inside is a ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-40)
Slightly yellowed envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama in Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, at Minidoka. Postmarked October 19, 1942. Along the top 10-23-1942 is written in red pencil. On the left side of the envelope is a purple "Censored" stamp. Inside the envelope is a letter dated October 17, 1942. Teru writes about ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama and Miriam Kiyo Koyama (ddr-one-5-22)
Yellowed envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama in Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, in the Portland Assembly Center. The envelope is postmarked August 24, 1942, and is stamped "VIA AIR MAIL" over the postmark. Written in blue pencil under the postage stamp is “Aug 23, 1942.” Written below the address in blue pencil is ...
Granada Christian Church Sunday School news, 1942 (ddr-csujad-7-21)
doc Granada Christian Church Sunday School news, 1942 (ddr-csujad-7-21)
Newsletter put out by the Granada Christian Church for it's congregation. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: HMLSC_Granada Christian Church Sunday School News
Buddhist church preliminary report (ddr-csujad-26-8)
doc Buddhist church preliminary report (ddr-csujad-26-8)
Description of the development and practices of the Buddhist Church at Tule Lake including Sunday school, adult services and the Young Buddhist Association (YBA). Includes several comparisons to the Christian Church and Christians at Tule Lake. Report compiled as a portion of the Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement Study (JERS). See this object in the California ...
Chapter 6 and 7 personality cards (ddr-csujad-26-34)
doc Chapter 6 and 7 personality cards (ddr-csujad-26-34)
Journal entries written by high school students discussing their observations and perspectives on a variety of topics including living in barracks, block noise, lack of privacy, mess hall dining, nosy neighbors, jobs, leisure time, sports, movies, church attendance, the Young Buddhist Association (YBA), family dynamics, social changes, dating, and rumors. Each entry includes the full date ...
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-12)
One cent postcard addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Fort Sill from his wife, Teru Koyama, at the Portland Assembly Center. Postmarked May 14, 1942. Message on the back dated May 13, 1942. Teru writes to Kei about her and the children getting their first typhoid shots, her new work duties, and the family's enjoyment of ...
Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama and Miriam Kiyo Koyama (ddr-one-5-30)
Envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, and daughter, Miriam Kiyo Koyama. Postmarked Sep 16, 1942. In red pencil “9/20-42” is written to the left of the postmark. In the lower left corner is a purple "Censored" stamp from Camp Livingston. Inside the envelope are two letters, one from ...
Obon, Rohwer, Arkansas (ddr-csujad-5-339)
img Obon, Rohwer, Arkansas (ddr-csujad-5-339)
Photographed are Akiko An and Kiku Tanimoto, Ayame May Okine, and Dorothy Ai Okine. It is taken during the obon event in the Rohwer incarceration camp. The handwritten notes on the backside read: Obon, Rohwer, Arkansas. A photograph from "Dorothy Ai Aoki photo album" (csudh_oki_0300), page 11. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese ...
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