Religion

Japanese Americans used religion as one way to handle the stress of the incarceration experience. Church served as both a spiritual comfort and a place for community gatherings. On Sundays, Buddhist and Christian services and Sunday schools were held in the recreation halls. State Shintoism was another popular religion within the Japanese American community but was banned by the U.S. government on the grounds that it included "Emperor worship." Church services initially were given in both Japanese and English, but camp authorities later banned the use of Japanese at all group gatherings (although translation into Japanese was later permitted at some religious services).

Religion (163)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Paul M. Nagano

163 items
Gathas and Service (ddr-densho-387-7)
doc Gathas and Service (ddr-densho-387-7)
English and Japanese language of Gathas and Services for Buddhist Services at Manzanar. The English reads left to right starting from the cover. The Japanese reads right to left starting at the cover.
Memorial plaque (ddr-densho-11-11)
img Memorial plaque (ddr-densho-11-11)
This plaque was placed at the base of the cross on Castle Rock on October 2, 1982. The plaque honors Christian ministers who served the inmates at the Tule Lake concentration camp.
First Communion class (ddr-densho-37-684)
img First Communion class (ddr-densho-37-684)
Original WRA caption: First Communion class of Catholic Church at Minidoka Relocation Center, Hunt, Idaho. The Rev. L.H. Tibesar, Maryknoll Missionary, is pastor. The nuns are Maryknoll sisters from the Maryknoll Mission in Seattle where the Maryknoll group numbered 1000 Japanese Catholics and non-Catholics before evacuation.
Thanksgiving day religious service (ddr-densho-37-788)
img Thanksgiving day religious service (ddr-densho-37-788)
Original WRA caption: Gila River Relocation Center, Rivers, Arizona. Sunrise Services (Christian) were held at this center Thanksgiving day.
Camp chapel (ddr-densho-93-42)
img Camp chapel (ddr-densho-93-42)
Original Ansel Adams caption: Entrance, Catholic chapel (V), Manzanar Relocation Center, California / photograph by Ansel Adams.
Letter (with envelope) to Mollie Wilson from Mary Murakami (December 25, 1942) (ddr-janm-1-32)
doc Letter (with envelope) to Mollie Wilson from Mary Murakami (December 25, 1942) (ddr-janm-1-32)
Handwritten letter to Mollie Wilson from Mary Murakami (December 25, 1942). Envelope is postmarked December 20, 1942 from the Poston (Colorado River) Incarceration Camp in Parker, Arizona.
Memo from the Manzanar Buddhist Church (ddr-manz-4-168)
doc Memo from the Manzanar Buddhist Church (ddr-manz-4-168)
Invitation to an "Appreciation Dinner and Entertainment Night."
Gyodo-kai members (ddr-manz-4-48)
img Gyodo-kai members (ddr-manz-4-48)
Caption in album: "Gyodo-kai Members 1943."
Memo from the Manzanar Buddhist Church (ddr-manz-4-167)
doc Memo from the Manzanar Buddhist Church (ddr-manz-4-167)
Invitation to an "Appreciation Dinner and Entertainment Night."
Paul Nagano Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-65-10)
vh Paul Nagano Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-65-10)
Efforts of Caucasian Christian churches to support Japanese Americans in concentration camps
Paul Nagano Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-65-7)
vh Paul Nagano Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-65-7)
Different denominations meld together as one ecumenical church in Poston concentration camp
Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letters to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-20)
White air mail envelope with a red, white and blue border. The envelope is addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama. The envelope is postmarked Jul 21, 1942, and in red pencil below the postmark is the date 7/25/42. On the left side of the envelope is a purple "Censored" ...
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