Education

Schools were quickly organized in the concentration camps, but they suffered from crude facilities and lack of teaching materials. Instruction was given for nursery through high school, and adult education was offered. Trained teachers were in short supply, however, and uncertified Japanese Americans with college degrees often filled in. The War Relocation Authority (WRA) deliberately emphasized Americanization in the education program. Some found it painfully ironic to watch incarcerated youth recite the Pledge of Allegiance.

World War II (54)
Concentration camps (556)
Education (782)

782 items
Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 9 (ddr-densho-1000-147-9)
vh Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 9 (ddr-densho-1000-147-9)
Comments on whether or not principles of American democracy were taught in Minidoka
Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-147-13)
vh Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-147-13)
Discussion of policy changes taking place at Minidoka, both in regards to leave clearance and the education system
Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-147-7)
vh Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 7 (ddr-densho-1000-147-7)
Tackling difficult issues involving incarceration through lessons and discussions within the classroom
Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-147-11)
vh Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1000-147-11)
Description of a typical school day for teachers in Minidoka; fond memories of the first school dance
Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-147-10)
vh Helen Amerman Manning Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-147-10)
Discussion of students taught at Minidoka: one the whole, positive memories
API