Medical care and health issues

Medical and dental facilities were for the most part inadequate, lacking in both equipment and staff. Doctors and nurses were overworked, and treatment was often substandard as well as delayed. Camp inmates recall outbreaks of food poisoning, tuberculosis and dysentery epidemics, and preventable deaths of patients and newborns.

Medical care and health issues (260)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Medical care in camp

259 items
Letter (with envelope) to Molly Wilson from June Yoshigai (March 21, 1943) (ddr-janm-1-82)
doc Letter (with envelope) to Molly Wilson from June Yoshigai (March 21, 1943) (ddr-janm-1-82)
Handwritten letter to Molly Wilson from June Yoshigai (March 21, 1943). Envelope is postmarked March 22, 1943 from the Gila River Incarceration Camp in Rivers, Arizona.
Pregnant Japanese American visiting doctor (ddr-densho-151-418)
img Pregnant Japanese American visiting doctor (ddr-densho-151-418)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Young expectant mother (center) receives check-up from her doctor (left) in the medical clinic, now housed in a temporary building, at this War Relocation Authority Center for evacuees of Japanese ancestry.
Japanese American doctor examining patient (ddr-densho-151-417)
img Japanese American doctor examining patient (ddr-densho-151-417)
Original caption: Manzanar Relocation Center, Manzanar, California. Making an examination of an evacuee patient are Doctor Takahashi, Ear, Nose and Throat Specialist, and his wife who is his assistant. They are evacuees of Japanese ancestry from Los Angeles now spending the duration at this War Relocation Authority Center.
Aiko Herzig Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1002-8-10)
vh Aiko Herzig Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1002-8-10)
Having a baby in camp: feeling angry because of lack of nutritious food for child

This interview was conducted by sisters Emiko and Chizuko Omori for their 1999 documentary, Rabbit in the Moon, about the Japanese American resisters of conscience in the World War II incarceration camps. As a result, the interviews in this collection are ...

Betty Morita Shibayama Interview Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-152-26)
vh Betty Morita Shibayama Interview Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-152-26)
A younger sister is born in camp; mother stayed to work in camp while father went out to work in Oregon
Kay Matsuoka Segment 39 (ddr-densho-1000-48-39)
vh Kay Matsuoka Segment 39 (ddr-densho-1000-48-39)
Last to leave, a difficult labor keeps camp hospital open, and Kay in camp
Ben Y. Tonooka Interview Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-390-21)
vh Ben Y. Tonooka Interview Segment 21 (ddr-densho-1000-390-21)
Hospitalized in camp for a heart condition

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

George Yoshida Interview Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-132-26)
vh George Yoshida Interview Segment 26 (ddr-densho-1000-132-26)
Witnessing medical reactions to incarceration while working at a camp hospital
API