Economic losses

The economic and emotional toll associated with the uprooting of Japanese Americans from their homes and businesses was enormous. The cost was especially high for the issei (first-generation immigrants), who had worked most of their lives to establish financial security for themselves and their children. Many Japanese Americans bitterly recall being forced to sell property, personal belongings, and business equipment for a fraction of their value to opportunistic scavengers. Evacuees could take only what they could carry. They left behind heirlooms, cherished toys, and family pets. Farmers continued to work for a harvest they would never see, told it would be "disloyal" to stop. The bustling Nihonmachis (Japantowns) of the West Coast closed down and never fully recovered, even after the war ended.

World War II (54)
Economic losses (233)

233 items
Gene Akutsu Interview Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1016-4-2)
vh Gene Akutsu Interview Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1016-4-2)
Preparing for mass removal

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Yoshimi Matsuura Interview Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1014-6-11)
vh Yoshimi Matsuura Interview Segment 11 (ddr-densho-1014-6-11)
Hearing about the bombing of Pearl Harbor: changed relationships with friends
Dave Tatsuno Interview II Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1005-4-2)
vh Dave Tatsuno Interview II Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1005-4-2)
Losing possessions to unscrupulous caretakers of property during the war
Harvey Watanabe Interview Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1008-5-15)
vh Harvey Watanabe Interview Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1008-5-15)
Loss of family property

Members of the National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS) arranged for and conducted this interview in conjunction with Densho.

Mollie Nakasaki Interview Segment 17 (ddr-jamsj-2-4-17)
vh Mollie Nakasaki Interview Segment 17 (ddr-jamsj-2-4-17)
Financial impact of incarceration on family business

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Perry Dobashi Interview Segment 10 (ddr-jamsj-2-3-10)
vh Perry Dobashi Interview Segment 10 (ddr-jamsj-2-3-10)
Financial impact of mass removal on family business

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Dave Tatsuno Interview Segment 10 (ddr-jamsj-2-6-10)
vh Dave Tatsuno Interview Segment 10 (ddr-jamsj-2-6-10)
Renters of home in San Francisco steal and sell belongings

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Mitsuko Hashiguchi Segment 33 (ddr-densho-1000-12-33)
vh Mitsuko Hashiguchi Segment 33 (ddr-densho-1000-12-33)
Packing for camp, and trying to protect farm assets; property loss and damage
Frank Sumida Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-261-13)
vh Frank Sumida Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-261-13)
Consequences of Pearl Harbor: losing father's restaurant business

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

Shigeko Sese Uno Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-98-18)
vh Shigeko Sese Uno Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-98-18)
Impact of mass removal on family business, selling at a loss, "we never recovered from, really..."
John Kanda Interview Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-116-3)
vh John Kanda Interview Segment 3 (ddr-densho-1000-116-3)
Forced to move to the Pinedale Assembly Center, California, losing the family farm

This interview is part of a collaborative effort of the Puyallup Valley Japanese American Citizens League and Densho.

Ed Tsutakawa Interview Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1000-196-15)
vh Ed Tsutakawa Interview Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1000-196-15)
Losing the family business after the bombing of Pearl Harbor

This interview was conducted as part of a project to capture stories of the Japanese American community of Spokane, Washington. Densho worked in collaboration with the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture.

Mutsu Homma Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-24-19)
vh Mutsu Homma Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1000-24-19)
Preparing for mass removal: forced to sell belongings, a piano for $25
Art Abe Interview Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-206-16)
vh Art Abe Interview Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-206-16)
Preparing for mass removal: selling the family's grocery store
Joe Yamakido Interview Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-167-6)
vh Joe Yamakido Interview Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-167-6)
Personal reactions to mass removal, family's economic losses: "I was bitter"
Community Analysis Notes, no. 1, January 15, 1944 (ddr-csujad-2-84)
doc Community Analysis Notes, no. 1, January 15, 1944 (ddr-csujad-2-84)
Titled as: From a Nisei who said "No." Account by an unnamed Community Analyst at Manzanar of the "life experience and viewpoints" influencing a young man's "No" response to the Army registration form's Question 28. The account stems from the analyst's notes, reproduced verbatim, from an exchange between the young man and the Hearing Board authorized ...
API