"Voluntary evacuation"

For a three-week period during World War II, after Japanese Americans had been excluded from the West Coast but before plans for concentration camps had been finalized, a period of "voluntary evacuation" took place. Government officials hoped that the Japanese Americans barred from keeping their homes on the West Coast would make arrangements to move inland on their own, saving valuable military resources. However, state government officials and residents of neighboring states reacted with outrage that Japanese Americans were being encouraged to move there. Most Japanese Americans feared moving into such hostile territory where they would know no one. Further, few Japanese Americans had the resources to move their families to a new place. In total, 4,889 Japanese Americans left the West Coast "voluntarily" and moved to the interior of the U.S. during that period.

"Voluntary evacuation" (41)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Voluntary evacuation

41 items
Tak Yamashita Interview Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-365-25)
vh Tak Yamashita Interview Segment 25 (ddr-densho-1000-365-25)
"Voluntary evacuation" to Colorado

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.

James Sakamoto Interview Segment 7 (ddr-jamsj-2-1-7)
vh James Sakamoto Interview Segment 7 (ddr-jamsj-2-1-7)
Moving to Stockton, California, in an attempt to avoid mass removal

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Family standing outside a gas station (ddr-densho-5-18)
img Family standing outside a gas station (ddr-densho-5-18)
The Fukuda family was originally from Seattle and voluntarily relocated to Nampa, Idaho, during World War II. After the war, the family moved to Spokane, Washington. Front (left to right): Janet, Lillian, and Alan Fukuda. Back: Jim Fukuda holding his daughter Mitsue, Mrs. Fukuda, and Rina Fukuda.
Jimmie Omura Interview Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1002-11-19)
vh Jimmie Omura Interview Segment 19 (ddr-densho-1002-11-19)
Avoiding mass removal by moving to Denver, Colorado

This interview was conducted by sisters Emiko and Chizuko Omori for their 1999 documentary, Rabbit in the Moon, about the Japanese American resisters of conscience in the World War II incarceration camps. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily ...

Art Imagire Interview Segment 8 (ddr-manz-1-34-8)
vh Art Imagire Interview Segment 8 (ddr-manz-1-34-8)
Family's decision to move to Reno following the bombing of Pearl Harbor
George T.
vh George T. "Joe" Sakato Interview Segment 12 (ddr-manz-1-29-12)
Traveling to Arizona, having to show travel permit at each town
Tak Yamashita Interview Segment 23 (ddr-densho-1000-365-23)
vh Tak Yamashita Interview Segment 23 (ddr-densho-1000-365-23)
Disposing of possessions and deciding to move to Colorado

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the ...

Mae Kanazawa Hara Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-168-10)
vh Mae Kanazawa Hara Interview Segment 10 (ddr-densho-1000-168-10)
Disposing of belongings; brothers moved during "voluntary evacuation" period
Fred Hirasuna Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1000-21-2)
vh Fred Hirasuna Segment 2 (ddr-densho-1000-21-2)
"Voluntary evacuation" to Minnesota from California

This interview was conducted at the Voices of Japanese American Redress Conference, held on the UCLA campus and sponsored by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center and the UCLA School of Public Policy and Social Research. Because of the full conference schedule, our interviews were limited to one hour. The ...

Asano Terao Interview II Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-109-4)
vh Asano Terao Interview II Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-109-4)
Avoiding concentration camps by moving to Salt Lake City, Utah (Japanese language)

This interview was conducted in Japanese and was translated so as to convey Mrs. Terao's way of speaking as closely as possible. For example, there are instances in which she makes some grammatical errors. These mistakes are conveyed through similar grammatical errors in English ...

Asano Terao Interview II Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-109-6)
vh Asano Terao Interview II Segment 6 (ddr-densho-1000-109-6)
Receiving monetary compensation for "voluntary evacuation" (Japanese language)

This interview was conducted in Japanese and was translated so as to convey Mrs. Terao's way of speaking as closely as possible. For example, there are instances in which she makes some grammatical errors. These mistakes are conveyed through similar grammatical errors in English in order to recreate ...

Floyd Schmoe Interview I Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-83-4)
vh Floyd Schmoe Interview I Segment 4 (ddr-densho-1000-83-4)
Assisting Japanese American students avoid the curfew and get off the West Coast

In this interview Mr. Schmoe refers to Aki Kurose, a former employee, fellow Quaker, peace activist, and long-time friend. At the time of this interview, Ms. Kurose had recently passed away after a long struggle with cancer. At the time of this interview, ...

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