Non-incarcerated Japanese Americans

A small percentage of Japanese Americans were not incarcerated during World War II: those who lived or worked outside the West Coast exclusion area and those who participated in "voluntary evacuation." During the war years, many of the non-incarcerated Japanese Americans faced hardship and discrimination, and were viewed with suspicion and even hostility by the greater public.

Non-incarcerated Japanese Americans (5)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Gyo Fujikawa, Frank "Foo" Fujita, Sadakichi Hartmann, Japanese American Committee for Democracy, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Ben Kuroki, T. Scott Miyakawa, Isamu Noguchi, Ina Sugihara, Clifford Uyeda, Minoru Yamasaki

5 items
Tad Sato Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-82-13)
vh Tad Sato Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-82-13)
Working for Great Northern Railway allows some to avoid concentration camps

Due to technical difficulties, this interview has audio problems in its second half.

Letter to Henrietta Schoen from Takuyo Togawa (ddr-densho-223-59)
doc Letter to Henrietta Schoen from Takuyo Togawa (ddr-densho-223-59)
A letter from the wife of a medical staffer at Sante Fe thanking Henrietta Schoen for her correspondence.
Oral history of Marilyn Fordney (ddr-csujad-28-1)
av Oral history of Marilyn Fordney (ddr-csujad-28-1)
Oral history interview of Marilyn Fordney. See this object in the California State Universities Japanese American Digitization project site: csuci_vcc-jic_0001
Letter from Ida Otani to Michi Weglyn, April 26, 1997 (ddr-csujad-24-135)
doc Letter from Ida Otani to Michi Weglyn, April 26, 1997 (ddr-csujad-24-135)
A letter from Ida Otani to Michi Weglyn about the firing of Japanese American railroad workers during World War II. Otani describes the hardships her family went through after her father was fired by Western Pacific Railroad and the family was forced to vacate their home because it was on railroad property. See this object in ...
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