Arrest, searches, and seizures

Many Nisei (second-generation Japanese Americans) can vividly recall their fathers being hauled off by FBI agents to unidentified destinations for an unknown duration. Not surprisingly, anxiety and uncertainty spread quickly after Pearl Harbor. Many precious heirlooms were burned by families wanting to rid themselves of any connection to Japan. FBI agents raided Japanese American homes, confiscating short wave radios, cameras, and books. With the systematic removal of Issei (first-generation) leaders, the Nisei -- children and teenagers for the most part -- were abruptly asked to represent the larger group as well as their own families. They found themselves translating FBI and military orders for their parents and helping to keep family businesses going.

World War II (66)
Pearl Harbor and aftermath (97)
Arrest, searches, and seizures (336)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Custodial detention / A-B-C list, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Rikita Honda, Terminal Island, California

336 items
Case file for Keizaburo Koyama from the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Page 4 of 6. (ddr-one-5-101)
doc Case file for Keizaburo Koyama from the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Page 4 of 6. (ddr-one-5-101)
Photocopy of a declassified report on Keizaburo Koyama. The page starts with a review of the 1928 census which states that Koyama entered the United States in December of 1918 and that he has a wife, a son named Katsumi, and two daughters named Eva and Kes. Myron Johnston, a neighbor of Koyama, tracked Koyama's family ...
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-13)
Postcard addressed to Dr. Keizabruo Koyama at Fort Sill from his wife, Teru Koyama, at the Portland Assembly Center. Postmarked May 15, 1942. Dated May 14, 1942. On the back Teru writes Kei asking if he needs more clothes, and that she had stored their belongs with Eva "Aunt Eva" Goodenough. She describes the food at ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from R. Maeda (ddr-one-5-54)
Yellowed envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama in Camp Livingston from R. Maeda at Minidoka. The envelope is postmarked April 28, 1943. Along the top of the envelope is "5/11-43" written in red pencil. Along the left edge of the envelope is clear tape that has the number 149 printed on it. The tape wraps around ...
Letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from his daughter Miriam Kiyo Koyama (ddr-one-5-16)
Letter dated June 21, 1942, from Miriam Kiyo Koyama to her father Kei Koyama. She wishes him a happy Father's Day, tells him that she joined 4H, and hopes that next year they will be together for Father's Day.
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Eva Koyama (ddr-one-5-11)
Front of one cent postcard is addressed to Dr. K. Koyama at Fort Sill from his daughter Eva Koyama at the Portland Assembly Center. Postmarked May 11, 1942. On the back of the postcard Eva writes about the family and first few days at the Portland Assembly Center. Dated May 7, 1942.
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Marie (ddr-one-5-5)
One cent postcard addressed to Dr. K. Koyama at Fort Missoula with no return sender. Postmarked Jan. 28, 1942. Purple "Examined" stamp in the upper left corner signed in red pencil. On the back, purple "Examined" stamp over center of text; postage cancellation in lower left corner. The message talks about his daugher Kiyo and wife ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-14)
White air mail envelope with a red, white and blue border. The envelope is addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Fort Sill from his wife, Teru Koyama, at the Portland Assembly Center. Postmarked May 25, 1942. On the left side of the envelope, written in pencil, is “Censored 5/31/42” with initials below. Inside the envelope is ...
Envelope and Birthday Card to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and Birthday Card to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama (ddr-one-5-36)
Envelope addressed to Dr. Kei Koyama at Camp Livingston. Return sender name is not visible, but the Block number is the same as the Koyama Family; addressed as Minidoka WRA Center. Postmarked October 1, 1942. In red pencil “Oct 6 1942” is written below the postmark. On the left side of the envelope is a purple ...
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-60)
One cent postcard addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Santa Fe Dentention Station from his wife, Teru Koyama, at Minidoka. Postmarked Jul 16, 1943. On the left side of the postcard is an "Examined" stamp signed "25-3." The message on the back of the postcard is dated July 16, 1943. Teru writes to tell Kei about ...
Memorandum For Mr. L.M.C. Smith Chief, Special Defense Unit - RE: Apprehension of Japanese Alien Portland Field Division (ddr-one-5-91)
doc Memorandum For Mr. L.M.C. Smith Chief, Special Defense Unit - RE: Apprehension of Japanese Alien Portland Field Division (ddr-one-5-91)
Photocopy of a declassified memorandum from John Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of investigation, to L.M.C. Smith, Chief, Special Defense Unit, letting him know that Keisaburo Koyama, a Japanese alien, was apprehended.
Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Postcard to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-27)
One cent postcard addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, at the Portland Assembly Center. Postmarked Sep 1, 1942, with a 6 cent airmail stamp. On the left side of the postcard are two purple stamps; one is an air mail stamp and the second is a "Censored" stamp. On ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama and Miriam Kiyo Koyama (ddr-one-5-22)
Yellowed envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama in Camp Livingston from his wife, Teru Koyama, in the Portland Assembly Center. The envelope is postmarked August 24, 1942, and is stamped "VIA AIR MAIL" over the postmark. Written in blue pencil under the postage stamp is “Aug 23, 1942.” Written below the address in blue pencil is ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Andrew "Uncle Chape" Goodenough and Eva "Aunt Eva" Goodenough (ddr-one-5-25)
Envelope addressed to Dr. Kei Koyama in Camp Livingston from Andrew "Uncle Chape" Goodenough and Eva "Aunt Eva" Goodenough in Portland. Postmarked Aug 31, 1942. On the left side of the envelope is a purple "Censored" stamp. Inside the envelope was a newspaper clipping about Boy Scout Troop at the Portland Assembly Center. William Koyama's name ...
Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo
doc Envelope and letter to Dr. Keizaburo "Kei" Koyama from Teru Koyama (ddr-one-5-58)
Envelope addressed to Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Santa Fe Dentention Station from his wife, Teru Koyama, at Minidoka. Postmarked Jun 22, 1943. In the upper center “6/28-43” is written in red pencil. Inside the envelope was a letter, in the center of the header is an "Examined" stamp. In the letter Teru writes about being apart ...
A unsent and unfinished postcard (ddr-one-5-44)
doc A unsent and unfinished postcard (ddr-one-5-44)
One cent postcard addressed to William K. Koyama at Minidoka from Dr. Keizaburo Koyama at Camp Livingston. Postcard has no postmark indicating it was never mailed. On the backside is an incomplete birthday message to his son William Koyama dated Nov. 12, 1942.
Man stacking confiscated radios (ddr-densho-36-31)
img Man stacking confiscated radios (ddr-densho-36-31)
Shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Japanese Americans were ordered by government officials to surrender their cameras and radios, ostensibly to prevent their use in treasonable activities. It is important to note that there are no documented cases of Japanese Americans taking part in such activities.
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