Nihonmachi ("Japantowns")

Because of housing and employment discrimination, Japanese Americans tended to cluster in ethnic neighborhoods known as Nihonmachi, or "Japantowns." Living, working, studying, and worshiping in close proximity made for tight-knit communities. With the forced removal of Japanese Americans in the spring of 1942, the bustling Nihonmachis of the West Coast closed down and never fully recovered, even after the war ended.

Community activities (601)
Nihonmachi ("Japantowns") (192)

192 items
Hand-drawn map of Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown (ddr-densho-24-17)
doc Hand-drawn map of Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown (ddr-densho-24-17)
This map of Nihonmachi, circa 1939, was drawn by Yukio Tazuma. Tazuma's parents owned the Tazuma Ten-Cent Store at 12th Avenue and Jackson Street before World War II. The map shows the many Japanese-owned businesses between 12th Avenue and Rainier Avenue South (upper Jackson Street).
View of Nihonmachi (Japantown) (ddr-densho-24-15)
img View of Nihonmachi (Japantown) (ddr-densho-24-15)
Seattle's Nihonmachi (Japantown) was a vibrant and active community prior to World War II. This view of Nihonmachi was taken from 12th Avenue and Jackson Street.
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 102, No. 4 (January 31, 1986) (ddr-pc-58-4)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 102, No. 4 (January 31, 1986) (ddr-pc-58-4)
Selected article titles: "Onizuka Killed in Space Shuttle Disaster" (p. 1), "Judges Overturn Dismissal of NCJAR Suit" (pp. 1, 5), and "Little Tokyo Tenants Protest Evictions" (p. 3).
Frank Hirahara at New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-80)
img Frank Hirahara at New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-80)
Black and white photographic negative of Frank Hirahara and Rose Mae Hara at the New Tokyo Bar in Portland, Oregon. For original print please ONLC 2855 (ddr-one-1-79).
New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-84)
img New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-84)
Black and white photographic negative of unidentified bar patrons at the New Tokyo Bar. Bartender George Ninomiya is behind the bar.
New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-81)
img New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-81)
Black and white photographic negative of two women behind the bar with the bartender at the New Tokyo Bar in Portland, Oregon. From left to right: unidentified, Rose Mae Hara and George Ninomiya.
Frank Hirahara at New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-79)
img Frank Hirahara at New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-79)
Original black and white photographic print of Frank Hirahara and Rose Mae Hara at the New Tokyo Bar in Portland, Oregon. For negative please see ONLC 2856 (ddr-one-1-80).
New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-82)
img New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-82)
Black and white photographic negative of unidentified men playing Gibson guitars at the New Tokyo Bar. For print please see ONLC 4949 (ddr-one-1-720)
New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-83)
img New Tokyo Bar (ddr-one-1-83)
Black and white photographic negative of an unidentified patron in the New Tokyo Bar sitting in a booth near two unidentified guitar players.
Memorandum for Alien Enemy Information Bureau Office of the Provost Marshal General War Department, Washington D.C. (ddr-one-5-210)
av Memorandum for Alien Enemy Information Bureau Office of the Provost Marshal General War Department, Washington D.C. (ddr-one-5-210)
Photocopy of a declassified memorandum for the reclassification of Keizaburo Koyama as a detained Enemy Alien. Koyama is currently listed as interned at Santa Fe, New Mexico and in the custody of Immigration and Naturalization Services.
Aiko photo studio (ddr-densho-35-296)
img Aiko photo studio (ddr-densho-35-296)
Aiko photo studio was located on Sixth and Jackson in Seattle's Nihonmachi or Japantown.
Issei women at the Astor Hotel (ddr-densho-35-298)
img Issei women at the Astor Hotel (ddr-densho-35-298)
These women and children are standing outside of the historic Astor Hotel, which housed the Nippon Kan Theatre.
Aiko photo studio (ddr-densho-35-295)
img Aiko photo studio (ddr-densho-35-295)
Aiko photo studio was located on the second floor of this building on Sixth and Jackson in Seattle.
Nihonmachi (Japantown) (ddr-densho-36-47)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) (ddr-densho-36-47)
South Jackson Street in Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown. The museum's original identifying information dated this photo to circa 1910. Densho's later date, circa 1920s, is based on the clothing shown in the photograph.
Nihonmachi (Japantown) (ddr-densho-42-1)
img Nihonmachi (Japantown) (ddr-densho-42-1)
This area later developed into Seattle's Nihonmachi, or Japantown.
Nihonmachi, or Japantown (ddr-densho-109-86)
img Nihonmachi, or Japantown (ddr-densho-109-86)
Center of Tacoma, Washington's Japantown at Thirteenth and Broadway.
Four children in Nihonmachi, or Japantown (ddr-densho-117-1)
img Four children in Nihonmachi, or Japantown (ddr-densho-117-1)
This photo was taken next to the Osaka Hotel, which was located on 308 Fifth Avenue South. (L to R): Mits, Shiz and Kaz Murakami and Emio (friend).
Two children at a Nihonmachi, or Japantown, market (ddr-densho-117-2)
img Two children at a Nihonmachi, or Japantown, market (ddr-densho-117-2)
This market was located on Fifth and Main Street. (Front to back): Kaz and Yosh.
Nihonmachi hotel (ddr-densho-124-16)
img Nihonmachi hotel (ddr-densho-124-16)
An Issei man stands in the doorway of his hotel, located on Yesler Avenue in Seattle's Nihonmachi or Japantown.
Dinner party (ddr-densho-124-27)
img Dinner party (ddr-densho-124-27)
These Issei are eating dinner at Maneki Restaurant in Seattle's Nihonmachi or Japantown. (L to R): Azuma (or Higashi), Eiji, unidentified, Tamura, unidentified, Azuma (or Higashi), Yoshizo (or Ryozo), Yamaguchi, Tadashi.
Nihonmachi restaurant (ddr-densho-140-2)
img Nihonmachi restaurant (ddr-densho-140-2)
Genji Mihara talks with the waiter at an Issei-operated cafe in Seattle's Nihonmachi or Japantown. (L to R): Genji Mihara, Sakae Ojima, unidentified.
Salt Lake City's Japantown (ddr-densho-162-10)
img Salt Lake City's Japantown (ddr-densho-162-10)
100 South between West Temple and 100 West. This photo was taken just before demolition and construction of Salt Palace convention center.
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