"Yellow Peril"

"Yellow peril" was a term used by anti-Japanese movement agitators in the early 1900s to describe the "threat" of Japanese immigration as a precursor to a Japanese invasion of the United States. Among the many groups and individuals who propagated the "yellow peril" myth were William Randolph Hearst's newspapers, which convinced many Californians during the early 1900s that a Japanese invasion was imminent.

"Yellow Peril" (52)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
James D. Phelan

52 items
Pacific Citizen, Vol. 44, No. 10 (March 8, 1957) (ddr-pc-29-10)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 44, No. 10 (March 8, 1957) (ddr-pc-29-10)
Select article titles: "Salt Lake bids for 1958 convention 15th Biennial may be co-sponsored by Mt. Olympus; dates not yet announced" (p. 1); Over $250,000 Awarded for Claims in Jan." (p. 1); "L.A. race relations progress in Look" (p. 1); "Repatriates Denied Right to Sue for Vested Property Return" (p. 1); "Flood Damage Light ...
Roger Daniels Interview Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1012-17-1)
vh Roger Daniels Interview Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1012-17-1)
Description of the "yellow peril" (audio only)

This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film Unfinished Business.

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are ...

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