"Yellow Peril"

"Yellow peril" was a term used by anti-Japanese movement agitators in the early 1900s to describe the "threat" of Japanese immigration as a precursor to a Japanese invasion of the United States. Among the many groups and individuals who propagated the "yellow peril" myth were William Randolph Hearst's newspapers, which convinced many Californians during the early 1900s that a Japanese invasion was imminent.

"Yellow Peril" (55)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
James D. Phelan

55 items
doc "Japs Bringing Frightful Disease" (ddr-densho-69-26)
Full headline: "Japs Bringing Frightful Disease. Danger Now is in the School. Unwise Law Gives Diseased Asiatic Place as Pupil. Many Come in on Each Ship."
doc "Japanese a Menace to American Women" (ddr-densho-69-1)
Full headline: "Japanese a Menace to American Women. Female Help is Being Driven Out. Unclean Practices of Orient Bringing Degredation and Debasement in the Train of Unrestricted Immigration."
Roger Daniels Interview Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1012-17-1)
vh Roger Daniels Interview Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1012-17-1)
Description of the "yellow peril" (audio only)

This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film Unfinished Business.

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material ...

Pacific Citizen, Vol. 113, No. 7 [September 13, 1991] (ddr-pc-63-32)
doc Pacific Citizen, Vol. 113, No. 7 [September 13, 1991] (ddr-pc-63-32)
Select article titles: "'Yellow peril' still with us in journalism, study says" (p. 1), "Group petitions to oppose L.A. war monument" (p. 1).
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