Returning home

When the camps closed, Japanese Americans were handed $25 and put on trains headed for the places they had been forcibly removed from nearly four years earlier. Harassment was common -- many returning Japanese Americans were greeted with signs reading "No Japs Allowed." Other discovered their property had been vandalized or stolen. Homes and businesses that had been boarded up or left in the care of others were abandoned and stripped of furnishings and goods. For the majority, who did not have homes to return to, housing was the most serious problem. Housing discrimination was severe in many areas and persisted to varying degrees until the civil rights legislation of the 1960s. Former camp inmates with no other options moved into hostels and converted community institutions with conditions not much better than the camps they had just left. Although this period was stressful, it is remembered as a time when people came together to share what they had.

Returning home (820)

Related articles from the Densho Encyclopedia :
Alien land laws, Hood River incident, Kazuo Masuda, Return to West Coast

820 items
Letter to a Nisei man from his father (ddr-densho-153-144)
doc Letter to a Nisei man from his father (ddr-densho-153-144)
Excerpt: "We got two trunks and a bag yesterday while we are absent." Sent from Los Angeles, California, possibly to Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Mollie Nakasaki Interview Segment 21 (ddr-jamsj-2-4-21)
vh Mollie Nakasaki Interview Segment 21 (ddr-jamsj-2-4-21)
Visiting a hostel for returning Japanese Americans postwar

This interview was conducted by the Japanese American Museum of San Jose, and is part of a project entitled "Lasting Stories: The Resettlement of San Jose Japantown," a collaborative project between the Japanese American Museum of San Jose and Densho.

Hisaye Yamamoto Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1002-10-13)
vh Hisaye Yamamoto Interview Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1002-10-13)
Leaving camp and returning to California

This interview was conducted by sisters Emiko and Chizuko Omori for their 1999 documentary, Rabbit in the Moon, about the Japanese American resisters of conscience in the World War II incarceration camps. As a result, the interviews in this collection are typically not life histories, instead primarily focusing on issues ...

Kay Sakai Nakao Interview Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1001-3-14)
vh Kay Sakai Nakao Interview Segment 14 (ddr-densho-1001-3-14)
Adjusting to returning home: "I don't know why, I just kept looking over my shoulder"
Bob Santos Interview I Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-339-13)
vh Bob Santos Interview I Segment 13 (ddr-densho-1000-339-13)
Memories of Japanese Americans' return to the community: mostly welcoming, some discrimination
Wedding party (ddr-densho-363-1)
img Wedding party (ddr-densho-363-1)
Photograph of the wedding party at Sam Sakamoto and Hanaye (Fujiwara) Sakamoto's wedding. The photograph was taken by Frank C. Hirahara. To view more photographs of the Sakamoto wedding and other photographs taken by Frank C. Hirahara please visit the Oregon Nikkei Endowment's Frank C. Hirahara Collection.
Mitsuko Hashiguchi Segment 63 (ddr-densho-1000-12-63)
vh Mitsuko Hashiguchi Segment 63 (ddr-densho-1000-12-63)
Struggling to rebuild the family farm, finally deciding to sell
Mitsuko Hashiguchi Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-12-16)
vh Mitsuko Hashiguchi Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-12-16)
Caucasians reach out to the Japanese Americans returning home from the camps
Esther Takei Nishio Interview Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-370-18)
vh Esther Takei Nishio Interview Segment 18 (ddr-densho-1000-370-18)
Leaving camp as part of a test group allowed to return early to the West Coast

This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily ...

Tomio Moriguchi Interview I Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-59-16)
vh Tomio Moriguchi Interview I Segment 16 (ddr-densho-1000-59-16)
Postwar opportunities for Japanese Americans: societal, cultural, and self-imposed limitations
Rick Sato Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1000-80-15)
vh Rick Sato Segment 15 (ddr-densho-1000-80-15)
Returning to eastern Washington, still a "Jap" to some
Paul Nagano Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-65-12)
vh Paul Nagano Segment 12 (ddr-densho-1000-65-12)
Re-establishing Japanese Christian churches on West Coast during the postwar resettlement period
Nobu Suzuki Interview II Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-87-20)
vh Nobu Suzuki Interview II Segment 20 (ddr-densho-1000-87-20)
Japanese Resettlement Committee's efforts to assist returning Japanese with housing

References are made to several of Nobu Suzuki's personal papers, which are currently available for public perusal at the University of Washington's Manuscripts and University Archives.

Ryo Imamura Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1000-27-1)
vh Ryo Imamura Segment 1 (ddr-densho-1000-27-1)
Role of the Berkeley Buddhist Temple in providing housing and serving the community during the postwar resettlement period
Frank Yamasaki Interview I Segment 34 (ddr-densho-1000-107-34)
vh Frank Yamasaki Interview I Segment 34 (ddr-densho-1000-107-34)
Starting over after the war: denial of all things Japanese, and attitude toward pardon of draft resisters
API