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            "title": "Hideo Hoshide Interview II",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born September 25, 1917, in Tacoma, Washington. Grew up in Tacoma except for living in Japan for several years at age four. Attended the University of Washington in Seattle, majoring in Political Science, Far Eastern Studies, with a minor in journalism. Prior to World War II, worked as sports editor for community newspaper, The Japanese American Courier. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, was removed along with wife to Pinedale Assembly Center, California, and then Tule Lake concentration camp, California. Had a daughter in Tule Lake, and then moved to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Recruited to work for the U.S. Army's Office of Strategic Services (OSS), was drafted, and trained in India. After the end of the war, was sent to Hiroshima, Japan, to conduct a U.S. government survey studying the effects of the atomic bomb on Japanese citizens. Returned to Seattle in 1946 and was the associate editor for another community newspaper, The Northwest Times. Worked for the Boeing Company postwar while raising a family. Was a founding member of the Seattle Nisei Veterans Committee, working on the group's newsletter for thirty years.",
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                    "id": 209,
                    "namepart": "Hideo Hoshide"
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                    "namepart": "Tom Ikeda"
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                    "namepart": "Dana Hoshide"
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            "display_name": "Etsuko Ichikawa Osaki",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born February 19, 1931, in Fresno, California. Family moved to Seattle, Washington, where father became minister of the Seattle Buddhist Temple. During the war, removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Transferred to the Crystal City internment camp, Texas, to be reunited with father, who was arrested by the FBI after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. After the war, returned to Seattle, where parents reestablished the Buddhist temple. Etsuko and her family eventually moved to Portland, Oregon."
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            "id": "82",
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            "display_name": "Shosuke Sasaki",
            "bio": "Issei male. Born March 26, 1912, in Yamaguchi-ken, Japan. Immigrated to United States in 1919. Lived in Pomeroy, Washington, and Seattle, Washington, before World War II. Incarcerated at the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington and the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Resettled in New York. As a member of the Newspaper Guild, led effort to eliminate pejorative use of \"Jap\" in newspapers. Was a strong critic of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL). After moving to Seattle, was active in formulating the \"Seattle Plan\" for redress in the early 1970s."
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            "id": "150",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "3 653/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "display_name": "Betty Morita Shibayama",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born May 30, 1933, in Hood River, Oregon. Raised in the Hood River valley on family farm. After December 7, 1941, removed to the Pinedale Assembly Center, California, and then to the Tule Lake concentration camp, California. In 1943, moved with family to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, before leaving camp for Chicago, Illinois, after the war. Married Art Shibayama, a Japanese Peruvian, and raised a family in Chicago, Illinois and San Jose, California. Involved in lobbying congresspeople in Washington, D.C., on behalf of Japanese Latin Americans and their fight for redress."
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            "id": "422",
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            "display_name": "Kaz T. Tanemura",
            "bio": "Male, Issei-han. Born April 27, 1928, in Japan. As an infant, came to the U.S. where parents had previously immigrated. Family ran a hotel in Seattle's Pioneer Square neighborhood. After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. After the war, returned to Seattle, finished high school, and attended the University of Washington. Drafted into the military, and assigned to serve overseas as a high-ranked engineer. After military discharge, returned to Seattle and worked in management at The Boeing Company."
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            "index": "5 655/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "display_name": "Warren Koichi Suzuki",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born February 27, 1921, in Seattle, Washington. At age ten, was sent to Japan to live and attend school. Returned to Seattle prior to World War II. During the war, was removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Answered \"no-no\" on the so-called \"loyalty questionnaire\" and was transferred to Tule Lake concentration camp, California. After leaving camp, returned to Seattle and lived with then wife and child in a hostel located in Seattle's Japanese language school. Established a postwar career with the City of Seattle."
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            "id": "ddr-densho-1000-138",
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            "index": "6 656/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "title": "Tosh Yasutake Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born 1922 in Seattle, WA. Father was employed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as interpreter for twenty years, until he was separated from family on December 7, 1941, and interned as an enemy alien. Graduated 1941, Cleveland High School, and attended University of Washington before being removed from Seattle with mother, sister and two brothers in 1942. Incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Worked as hospital attendant and laboratory technician in Minidoka. While incarcerated in Minidoka, volunteered for U.S. Army, March, 1943. Allowed to travel from Minidoka, with sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada, to visit their father, Jack Kaichiro Yasutake, incarcerated at U.S. Department of Justice internment camp in Lordsburg, NM. Mr. Yasutake passed away on December 12, 2016. After basic training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, served in Europe in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team as a medic assigned to Company I, 2nd Platoon. Wounded during combat in southern France, October, 1944. Awarded Bronze Star. After recovery, assigned as a medic to Anti-tank Company, 1st platoon. December, 1945 discharged from the army. After visiting parents and younger brother in Cincinnati and living briefly in New York City, returned to Seattle. Married. Received B.A., Zoology, from University of Washington. Began career in research on fish pathology. Had four children. Received Ph.D in Fish Pathology from the University of Tokyo. Retired in 1988 as Research Histologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, after 36 years. Continues to serve as a Senior Scientist Emeritus in a volunteer capacity. Dr. W.T. Yasutake is the author of numerous articles published in scholarly journals, and the book, Microscopic Anatomy of Salmonids. He received awards and recognition for his pioneering and outstanding contributions to his professional field.<p>(William Toshio Yasutake was interviewed together with his sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada and surviving brother, Joseph Yasutake, in group sessions on October 8-9, 2002. He was interviewed individually on November 14, 2002.<p></p>Before being contacted by Densho, the Yasutake siblings had planned to conduct their own family history interviews. Individually and jointly, they and other family members had written and gathered material documenting their family history. They shared much of this with me to assist with research and preparation for the Densho interview. Mitsuye's daughter Jeni had coordinated much of the family history work. Jeni participated as a secondary interviewer during the group sessions, October 8-9, 2002.<p></p>The group interview sessions were conducted in Seattle at the home of Tom Ikeda, executive director of Densho. The oldest Yasutake sibling, Reverend Seiichi Michael Yasutake, had passed away less than a year before the Densho interviewing, in December, 2001. The remaining siblings emphasized that his absence left a gap in their discussion of family history. In addition to Jeni Yamada and videographers Dana Hoshide and John Pai, also present during some portions of the group interview were Tom Ikeda, and Mitsuye Yamada's son Kai Yamada.)",
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                    "namepart": "Tosh Yasutake"
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                    "namepart": "Alice Ito"
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                    "namepart": "Tom Ikeda"
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                    "namepart": "Dana Hoshide"
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        {
            "id": "113",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "7 657/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "display_name": "Robert Mizukami",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born December 20, 1922, in Star Lake, Washington. Grew up in the Renton area and later in Fife, Washington. Immigrant father began three-generation greenhouse business in Fife. Following Executive Order 9066, the Mizukami family was removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington (nicknamed \"Camp Harmony\"). Later, transported to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Served in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, earning Purple Heart. Relocated to Fife, Washington, married and returned to family-owned greenhouse business. Served on Fife city council, then as mayor of Fife for seven years. Received Order of the Sacred Treasure from the Japanese government."
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            "id": "185",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "8 658/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "display_name": "May Y. Namba",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born May 12, 1922, in Seattle, Washington. Spent brief time in Japan as a young child, then returned to Seattle. Worked as a clerk in the Seattle School District until the onset of World War II, then was forced to resign under pressure from parent groups. Removed with family to Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Moved to Chicago after leaving camp before eventually returning to Seattle. Took part in the redress movement of the 1980s, helping to obtain redress for the Japanese American Seattle School district clerks who wrongly lost their jobs."
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            "id": "207",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "9 659/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/207/",
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            "display_name": "George Morihiro",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born September 19, 1924, in Tacoma, Washington, and spent childhood in Fife, Washington. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Drafted into the army in 1944 and joined the 442nd Regimental Combat Team in Europe. Awarded the Purple Heart for actions in the Battle of the Gothic Line. After the war, briefly resettled in Fife before going to the East Coast to attend photography school. Worked for Tall's Camera in Seattle, Washington for many years. Currently speaks to many school groups and community organizations about wartime experiences."
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            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-3",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "10 660/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "title": "Minoru Yasui Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born October 19, 1916, in Hood River, Oregon. Earned a law degree from the University of Oregon law school and was practicing law prior to World War II. In 1942, deliberately defied the curfew imposed upon Japanese Americans in Portland, Oregon, and was arrested. His case was tried, and he was sentenced to one year in prison and given a $5000 fine. The appeal eventually reached the Supreme Court, which ruled that the government did have the authority to restrict the lives of civilian citizens during wartime. Yasui's fine was removed and he was released to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. In the 1980s, his case was reopened under writ of error coram nobis, and 1986 his conviction was overturned by the Oregon federal court.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>.</p><p>This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
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                    "id": 519,
                    "namepart": "Minoru Yasui"
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            "language": [
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            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Hood River, Oregon",
            "status": "completed"
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            "id": "9",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "11 661/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "display_name": "George Fugami",
            "bio": "Kibei male. Born 1915 in Portland, Oregon. Sent with siblings to be educated in Japan when ten years old. Returned to the United States in 1935. During World War II, was incarcerated at the Portland Assembly Center, Oregon, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Active in Seattle's postwar Japanese American community as a member and past president of the First Hill Lions Club; past president of the Atlantic Street Center, past president of Franklin High School Band PTA, past zone chairman of the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) and past JACL district governor, area 19-B. In his interview, discusses childhood memories of Japan and Japanese attitudes and values."
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        {
            "id": "111",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "12 662/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "display_name": "Yasashi Ichikawa",
            "bio": "Issei female. Born 1907 in Shimonoseki, Japan. Attended school in Japan, and was encouraged by father to study English. Married a Buddhist minister and immigrated to the United States. Lived in Fresno, California, then returned to Japan for two years. Moved to Seattle, Washington, where husband was a minister at the Seattle Buddhist Temple. During World War II, husband was arrested and imprisoned in the Crystal City Department of Justice Camp, Texas. Mrs. Ichikawa, with her seven children, was removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, then to Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Joined husband in Crystal City before returning to run the Seattle Buddhist Temple."
        },
        {
            "id": "136",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "13 663/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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            "display_name": "Ruby Inouye",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born November 17, 1920, in Seattle, Washington. Grew up in Seattle, and graduated salutatorian from Broadway High School. Was enrolled in the pre-medical program at the University of Washington on December 7, 1941. During the war, removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Left camp to attend the University of Texas, and later Woman's Medical College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Returned to Seattle to open a private family medicine practice, and succeeded with the help of the Issei community. Involved in helping to establish a nursing home for Japanese Americans in Seattle, and retired from private practice at age seventy-five."
        },
        {
            "id": "594",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "14 664/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/594/",
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            "display_name": "Art Ishida",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born June 2, 1921, in Fresno, California. Grew up in the Gardena area of Los Angeles, California, before moving to Japan with parents in 1929 and returning to California in the 1930s. During World War II, removed to the Santa Anita Assembly Center, California, and the Jerome concentration camp, Arkansas. Gave a qualified answer on the so-called \"loyalty questionnaire and was transferred to the Tule Lake concentration camp, California. Moved briefly to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, before being released from camp and living in Chicago, Illinois. Drafted into the military and served in Korea as an interpreter for the Military Intelligence Service. Eventually returned to California."
        },
        {
            "id": "952",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "15 665/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
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            "display_name": "Kikuno Goi",
            "bio": "Kibei Nisei couple. Kikuno was born in the United States, then moved to Japan with her family after her father passed away. In the lead up to World War II, her uncle sent Kikuno and her brother back to the United States, where they were raised in foster care in northern California. During World War II, Kikuno was sent with missionaries to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Mitsuo was born in the United States and then sent to live with an uncle in Japan. He returned to the U.S. before World War II, then was sent to the Amache concentration camp, Colorado. The couple met in Chicago after the war."
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            "id": "953",
            "model": "narrator",
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            "display_name": "Mitsuo Goi",
            "bio": "Kibei Nisei couple. Kikuno was born in the United States, then moved to Japan with her family after her father passed away. In the lead up to World War II, her uncle sent Kikuno and her brother back to the United States, where they were raised in foster care in northern California. During World War II, Kikuno was sent with missionaries to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Mitsuo was born in the United States and then sent to live with an uncle in Japan. He returned to the U.S. before World War II, then was sent to the Amache concentration camp, Colorado. The couple met in Chicago after the war."
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            "title": "Mihara Collection",
            "description": "The Mihara Collection features photographs of the Mihara family as well as the personal correspondence written by Genji Mihara to his wife during his World War II imprisonment in various detention camps. Mihara, a prominent Issei leader of the Japanese American community, was arrested immediately following the attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and taken to the Seattle INS station. After a few weeks he was transferred to Fort Missoula internment camp, Montana and then to Lordsburg internment camp, New Mexico. Mihara held prominent positions in the camp government system, elected by his fellow internees as mayor at both Fort Missoula and Lordsburg. Like many Issei men, Mihara was separated from his family during this period. His wife, Katsuno, and sons, Roy and Arthur, were held at Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, while his other son, George, was in the army. An accomplished poet, Mihara's letters to his wife often reflected the sense of longing he felt for his home and family.",
            "extent": "25 photographic prints, black and white; 149 documents",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-140",
            "language": [
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                "jpn"
            ],
            "contributor": "Densho",
            "public": "1",
            "rights": "pcc",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "7",
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            "index": "18 668/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/7/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/byone.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/byone.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/7/interviews/"
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            "display_name": "Yone Bartholomew",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born April 12, 1904, in Bedderavia, California. Was given for adoption by her parents to a couple who could not have children of their own. Grew up on a family farm and was one of the oldest Nisei in the Santa Barbara area of California. Incarcerated at the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Widow of Clarence Arai, lawyer and key figure in founding of the Japanese American Citizens League. In her interview, discusses childhood and memories of being married to Clarence during the turbulent war years. After the war, supported the family and cared for the ailing Clarence until his death in 1964. Remarried to George Bartholomew in 1978."
        },
        {
            "id": "131",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "19 669/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/131/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/131/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ytosh.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ytosh.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/131/interviews/"
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            "display_name": "Tosh Yasutake",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born 1922 in Seattle, WA. Father was employed by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as interpreter for twenty years, until he was separated from family on December 7, 1941, and interned as an enemy alien. Graduated 1941, Cleveland High School, and attended University of Washington before being removed from Seattle with mother, sister and two brothers in 1942. Incarcerated at Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. Worked as hospital attendant and laboratory technician in Minidoka. While incarcerated in Minidoka, volunteered for U.S. Army, March, 1943. Allowed to travel from Minidoka, with sister Mitsuye (Yasutake) Yamada, to visit their father, Jack Kaichiro Yasutake, incarcerated at U.S. Department of Justice internment camp in Lordsburg, NM. Mr. Yasutake passed away on December 12, 2016. After basic training at Camp Shelby, Mississippi, served in Europe in the 442nd Regimental Combat Team as a medic assigned to Company I, 2nd Platoon. Wounded during combat in southern France, October, 1944. Awarded Bronze Star. After recovery, assigned as a medic to Anti-tank Company, 1st platoon. December, 1945 discharged from the army. After visiting parents and younger brother in Cincinnati and living briefly in New York City, returned to Seattle. Married. Received B.A., Zoology, from University of Washington. Began career in research on fish pathology. Had four children. Received Ph.D in Fish Pathology from the University of Tokyo. Retired in 1988 as Research Histologist for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, after 36 years. Continues to serve as a Senior Scientist Emeritus in a volunteer capacity. Dr. W.T. Yasutake is the author of numerous articles published in scholarly journals, and the book, Microscopic Anatomy of Salmonids. He received awards and recognition for his pioneering and outstanding contributions to his professional field."
        },
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            "model": "segment",
            "index": "20 670/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1000-137-2/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1000-137-2/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1000/denshovh-ymitsuye-01-a.jpg",
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            "title": "Mitsuye May Yamada Interview Segment 2",
            "description": "Living and working in an American Friends' hostel in Cincinnati after leaving Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho<p>Mitsuye Yamada was interviewed together with her two surviving brothers, William Toshio Yasutake and Joseph Yasutake, in group sessions on October 8-9, 2002. She was interviewed individually on October 9-10, 2002.<p></p>Before being contacted by Densho, the Yasutake siblings had planned to conduct their own family history interviews. Individually and jointly, they and other family members had written and gathered material documenting their family history. They shared much of this with me to assist with research and preparation for the Densho interview. Mitsuye's daughter Jeni had coordinated much of the family history work. Jeni participated as a secondary interviewer during the group sessions, October 8-9, 2002.<p></p>The group interview sessions were conducted in Seattle at the home of Tom Ikeda, executive director of Densho. The oldest Yasutake sibling, Reverend Seiichi Michael Yasutake, had passed away less than a year before the Densho interviewing, in December, 2001. The remaining siblings emphasized that his absence left a gap in their discussion of family history. In addition to Jeni Yamada and videographers Dana Hoshide and John Pai, also present during some portions of the group interview were Tom Ikeda, and Mitsuye Yamada's son Kai Yamada.",
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                    "id": 129,
                    "namepart": "Mitsuye May Yamada"
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                    "namepart": "Alice Ito"
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                    "role": "videographer",
                    "namepart": "Dana Hoshide"
                }
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            "topics": [
                {
                    "term": "World War II -- Leaving camp -- \"Resettlement\"",
                    "id": "104"
                }
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            "language": [
                "eng"
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            "contributor": "Densho",
            "geography": [
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                    "term": "Cincinnati, Ohio",
                    "id": "\"http://vocab.getty.edu/tgn/7013604\""
                }
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            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Seattle, Washington",
            "status": "completed"
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            "id": "519",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "21 671/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/519/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/519/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/yminoru.jpg",
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                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/519/interviews/"
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            "display_name": "Minoru Yasui",
            "bio": "Nisei male. Born October 19, 1916, in Hood River, Oregon. Earned a law degree from the University of Oregon law school and was practicing law prior to World War II. In 1942, deliberately defied the curfew imposed upon Japanese Americans in Portland, Oregon, and was arrested. His case was tried, and he was sentenced to one year in prison and given a $5000 fine. The appeal eventually reached the Supreme Court, which ruled that the government did have the authority to restrict the lives of civilian citizens during wartime. Yasui's fine was removed and he was released to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. In the 1980s, his case was reopened under writ of error coram nobis, and 1986 his conviction was overturned by the Oregon federal court."
        },
        {
            "id": "321",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "22 672/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/321/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/321/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ayae.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ayae.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/321/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Yae Aihara",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born August 18, 1925 in Tacoma, Washington. Raised in Seattle, Washington, where family operated a grocery store. Attended Washington Grammar School and Garfield High School in Seattle. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, father was arrested by the FBI and sent to Missoula internment camp, Montana. Family was removed to Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. In 1943, father decided to repatriate to Japan. The family was transported to Ellis Island detention station to reunite with father and board a repatriation ship, the SS Gripsholm. Transferred to Crystal City internment camp, Texas, after being denied entry on SS Gripsholm. Remained in Crystal City for duration of the war. Resettled to Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles in 1946."
        },
        {
            "id": "214",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "23 673/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/214/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/214/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ibetty.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/ibetty.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/214/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Betty Fumiye Ito",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born April 29, 1918, in Seattle, Washington, and spent childhood in Medina and Bellevue, Washington. While in high school was a member of the Bellevue Strawberry Festival's Queen's Court. In 1939 married Kenji Ito, a prominent Japanese American lawyer who practiced in Seattle. Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, recounts her experiences as her husband was picked up by the FBI on the evening of December 7, 1941. Describes the trial and acquittal of her husband after he was accused of working as a non-registered agent for Japan. After the trial, was removed to the Puyallup Assembly Center, Washington, Tule Lake concentration camp, California, and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. After the war, resettled in the Los Angeles area."
        },
        {
            "id": "77",
            "model": "narrator",
            "index": "24 674/{'value': 689, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/narrators/77/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/77/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/osue.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/narrators/osue.jpg",
                "interviews": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/narrator/77/interviews/"
            },
            "display_name": "Sue Takimoto Okabe",
            "bio": "Nisei female. Born 1928 in Tacoma, Washington, moved with her family to Seattle at age four. At age six, began singing, taking voice lessons and performing on stage for Japanese American community events. In 1942, was incarcerated with her family at Puyallup Assembly Center and Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho, where she continued to sing -- including performances outside of the camp arranged by camp authorities. Remembers fondly the freedom from parental supervision teenagers experienced while in camp. In fact, after the family was allowed early release to relocate in Denver in April 1943, she ran away from home and briefly returned to Minidoka. In Denver, continued her music studies and joined a United Service Organization (USO) group, experiencing both racial prejudice and warm welcome at USO performances. Postwar, resettled with her family in Los Angeles, where she attended the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music, University of California, Los Angeles, and University Southern California. Continued to pursue music as a hobby through schooling, marriage, and two children. Began teaching private piano and voice lessons in 1952. Following her divorce in 1958, began singing in nightclubs and lounges."
        }
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