OBJECT CHILDREN DOCS

s - sort
n - number of results AKA page size (limit)
p - page (offset)

GET /api/0.2/ddr-janm/children/
HTTP 200 OK
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Vary: Accept

{
    "total": 6,
    "page_size": 25,
    "prev": null,
    "next": null,
    "hits": [],
    "aggregations": {},
    "objects": [
        {
            "id": "ddr-janm-1",
            "model": "collection",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-janm-1/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-janm-1/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-1/ddr-janm-1-1-mezzanine-a29e645e8e-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-1/ddr-janm-1-1-mezzanine-a29e645e8e-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Mollie Wilson Murphy Collection",
            "description": "Mollie Wilson Murphy was an African-American woman who lived in Boyle Heights during World War II.  She had many Japanese-American friends who were forced into concentration camps during the war.  This collection comprises of the correspondences between Mollie and her friends in camp.  The Mollie Wilson Papers include correspondence, school photographs, and miscellaneous photos in Boyle Heights of Mollie and friends before the war, during and after camp.   There are also mimeographs, and newspaper clippings.",
            "signature_id": "ddr-janm-1-1-mezzanine-a29e645e8e",
            "role": "",
            "extent": "Correspondences that totals 112 letters and 27 photographs; 0.5 linear feet.",
            "collection_id": "ddr-janm-1"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-janm-2",
            "model": "collection",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-janm-2/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-janm-2/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-2/ddr-janm-2-1-mezzanine-c958f8e3f5-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-2/ddr-janm-2-1-mezzanine-c958f8e3f5-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Fumio Nakamura Collection",
            "description": "One panoramic photograph of Corporal Edward Nakamura's military funeral. Taken in 1946 in Puʻunēnē, Maui, Hawai'I, when the remains of Corporal Edward Etsuzo Nakamura were finally returned to the family (KIA in November 1943). The photograph was taken in front of the family's home in a plantation village, McGerrow Camp, which no longer exists.",
            "signature_id": "ddr-janm-2-1-mezzanine-c958f8e3f5",
            "role": "",
            "extent": "One panoramic photograph measuring 33W x 7.25H",
            "collection_id": "ddr-janm-2"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-janm-4",
            "model": "collection",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-janm-4/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-janm-4/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-4/ddr-janm-4-1-mezzanine-0545736268-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-4/ddr-janm-4-1-mezzanine-0545736268-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Tsuyako Kitashima Collection",
            "description": "Various materials from Topaz, Redress, the National Coalition for Redress and Reparations (NCRR), and the Japanese American Citizens' League (JACL) by Tsuyako \"Sox\" Kitashima. Kitashima was born in Hayward, California in 1918. Her and her family were among the 120,000 Japanese Americans forcefully interned in war relocation camps during World War Two. They were first taken to a temporary assembly center in Tanforan, California and then relocated to the Topaz Incarceration Camp in Utah. After the war, Kitashima was on the front line fighting for redress. She became a well-known activist and a spokesperson for the NCRR. With her help, the Civil Liberties Act of 1988 was passed which called for the formal apology of the American government to the Japanese Americans as well as compensation of $20,000 for every surviving internee.",
            "signature_id": "ddr-janm-4-1-mezzanine-0545736268",
            "role": "",
            "extent": "43 objects pertaining to the Topaz Incarceration Camp, Japanese American Redress, the National Coalition for Redress and Reparations, and the Japanese American Citizens' League.",
            "collection_id": "ddr-janm-4"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-janm-5",
            "model": "collection",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-janm-5/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-janm-5/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-5/ddr-janm-5-1-mezzanine-82241b6157-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-5/ddr-janm-5-1-mezzanine-82241b6157-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Santa Anita Pacemaker Newspapers Collection",
            "description": "The Santa Anita Pacemaker was a newspaper published for approximately 19,000 Japanese Americans who were relocated to the Santa Anita racetrack turned assembly center for the temporary internment of Japanese Americans. The newspaper ran for six months in 1942 and was the longest running newspaper out of all the Japanese American assembly centers. It was published twice a week first on Tuesdays and Fridays and then on Wednesdays and Saturdays. The Pacemaker read like a typical small town newspaper, covering every day activities and events that occurred throughout the assembly center. The newspaper was led by editor Eddie Shimano and only ever had nine staff members and writers. In the first issue of the newspaper, the editorial staff asked its readers to submit names for what it should be called, and \"The Pacemaker\" was selected. \"Pacemaker\" is a term used in horse racing and refers to the horse that leads the way, therefore setting the pace for the other horses up until a certain point. Like all assembly centers, and internment camp newspapers, the newspaper operated under strict regulations and censorship. The staff and writers were prohibited from using the Japanese language and each newspaper edition had to go through multiple approvals by camp administrators before being published. The collection starts from the very first Pacemaker (April 21, 1942) up through newspaper number fifty (October 7, 1942) and a final book-like Pacemaker with no specific date.",
            "signature_id": "ddr-janm-5-1-mezzanine-82241b6157",
            "role": "",
            "extent": "Four-paged, six-paged, and eight-paged 8.5W x 14H newspapers; 0.25 linear feet.",
            "collection_id": "ddr-janm-5"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-janm-6",
            "model": "collection",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-janm-6/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-janm-6/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-6/ddr-janm-6-1-mezzanine-94be9f71ec-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-6/ddr-janm-6-1-mezzanine-94be9f71ec-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "The Rohwer Outpost Newspapers Collection",
            "description": "Newspaper of the Rohwer Incarceration camp located in McGehee, Arkansas which had a peak population of 8,475 in November of 1943. The Rohwer Outpost ran from October 24, 1942 to July 21, 1945 and was published twice a week on Wednesdays and Saturdays. It was then renamed the Rohwer Relocator released by the WRA to provide inmates with the camp's closing procedures and relocation opportunities. The Outpost was similar to that of a small town newspaper in that it covered every day events and activities that went on in camp as well as original editorial pieces. The newspaper had both an English section and a Japanese section, \"Jiho\", starting on opposite ends of the newspaper. The Japanese \"Jiho\" section started on December 24, 1942 and was largely a direct translation of the English version. Like some of the other incarceration camps, but unlike the assembly centers, the Outpost was considered to be uncensored for the most part. It had a total of fifteen staff members including editors Bean Takeda and Barry Saiki as well as artist George Akimoto who created the editorial cartoon character, \"Lil Dan'l\", and eventually became the camp's mascot.",
            "role": "",
            "signature_id": "ddr-janm-6-1-mezzanine-94be9f71ec",
            "extent": "Holdings consist of 9 issues. Volume 6, Numbers 9, 11-15, 17, 21-22. Covers January 24 through March 10, 1945.",
            "collection_id": "ddr-janm-6"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-janm-13",
            "model": "collection",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-janm-13/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-janm-13/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-13/denshovh-idaniel-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-janm-13/denshovh-idaniel-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Japanese American National Museum Collection",
            "description": "This collection consists of interviews conducted in by the Japanese American National Museum of Los Angeles, California in partnership with Densho.\r\nFor more information about the museum, please visit www.janm.org.",
            "signature_id": "denshovh-idaniel-02",
            "role": "",
            "extent": "6 oral history interviews",
            "collection_id": "ddr-janm-13"
        }
    ]
}