Information for a specific object.

GET /api/0.2/ddr-densho-359/
HTTP 200 OK
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{
    "id": "ddr-densho-359",
    "model": "collection",
    "collection_id": "ddr-densho-359",
    "links": {
        "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-359/",
        "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-359/",
        "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-359/ddr-densho-359-1271-mezzanine-86b0519873-a.jpg",
        "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-359/ddr-densho-359-1271-mezzanine-86b0519873-a.jpg",
        "parent": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho/",
        "children": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-359/children/"
    },
    "parent_id": "ddr-densho",
    "organization_id": "ddr-densho",
    "signature_id": "ddr-densho-359-1271-mezzanine-86b0519873",
    "title": "Okano Family Collection",
    "description": "The Okano Family Collection is comprised of photographs, letters, and ephemera from the personal family collection of Pam Okano. The photographs depict the lives of the of the Kawamotos, Okanos, and Otsukas prewar in Japan and Western Washington, as well as during the war when the family was granted leave to work in Caldwell, Idaho, and post-war when they returned to Washington.",
    "breadcrumbs": [
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-359",
            "model": "collection",
            "idpart": "cid",
            "label": "359",
            "api_url": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-359/",
            "url": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-359/"
        }
    ],
    "status": "completed",
    "unitdatebulk": "1920-1956",
    "contributor": "Densho",
    "processinfo": "Signed release form added to administrative tab under ddr-densho-359-1 (CC 5/19).",
    "prefercite": "Courtesy of Okano Family Collection, Densho",
    "unitdateinclusive": "1912-1998",
    "public": "1",
    "record_created": "2018-07-02T15:17:28",
    "extent": "7 photograph albums and one box of loose photographs, letters, and ephemera.",
    "acqinfo": "Pam Okano \r\nContact information:\r\[email protected]\r\n206-522-0633",
    "_fields": [
        "id",
        "record_created",
        "record_lastmod",
        "status",
        "public",
        "title",
        "unitdateinclusive",
        "unitdatebulk",
        "creators",
        "extent",
        "language",
        "contributor",
        "description",
        "physloc",
        "rights",
        "accessrestrict",
        "userrestrict",
        "prefercite",
        "bioghist",
        "scopecontent",
        "relatedmaterial",
        "separatedmaterial",
        "signature_id"
    ],
    "language": [
        "eng",
        "jpn"
    ],
    "rights": "cc",
    "bioghist": "The Okano Family Collection contains materials of three different branches of the Okano family, the Okanos, the Kawamotos, and the Ostukas. These three branches represent Pam Okano's father's family (Okano), mother's family (Kawamoto), and her maternal aunt and uncle (Ostuka).\r\n\r\nPhillip Masaru Okano (10/21/13 - 08/15/1998) was the son of Toshiyuki \"Tom\" Okano and Haruno Okano. Toshiyuki and Haruno immigrated to Washington state from Takuma, Hiroshima-ken, Japan. Toshiyuki operated a laundry business first in Bellingham and then in Shelton while Haruno did sewing, knitting, and crochet. Phillip's parents sent him to Japan for his education from 1923-1933. Phillip married Alice Kawamoto on February 16, 1941. For their honeymoon, Phillip and Alice took a road trip down the West Coast. Phillip liked to take photographs of architectural work including buildings and bridges. While taking photographs of the Ross Island Bridge and other commercial and business buildings in Portland, Oregon, Phillip was stopped by authorities and asked what he was doing. He wasn't arrested or searched and the two newlyweds continued south. During World War II Phillip and Alice were granted permanent work leave from Tule Lake Concentration Camp and spent the remainder of the war in Caldwell, Idaho working on Roy I. Abe's farm. Phillip did spend some time in Denver, Colorado and Amanche Concentration Camp visiting family and gaining more experience in laundry services. After the war, Phillip and Alice returned to Shelton and the Okano family laundry business. \r\n\r\nAlice Yoshiko Kawamoto (10/21/1917-12/12/1967) was the youngest daughter of Kaichi and Itsuno Kawamoto. Kaichi Kawamoto immigrated from Nagatani, Hiroshima-ken, Japan in 1898 with his wife, Itsuno, from Koizumi, Hiroshima-ken immigrating in 1906. The Kawamotos operated a farm in Leland, Washington. Alice graduated at the top of her class in high school. She attended Charette School of Costume and Design in Seattle in 1940. Alice married Phillip Okano on February 16, 1941. During World War II, Alice and Phillip were granted permanent work leave from Tule Lake Concentration Camp and spent the remained of the war in Caldwell, Idaho working on Roy I. Abe's farm. Alice's parents, Kaichi and Itsuno, as well as her sister, Jeanette Otsuka, and brother-in-law, Eiichi \"Eddie\" Otsuka also were granted permanent work leave and joined Alice and Phillip in Caldwell, Idaho. \r\n\r\nJeanette Yoneko Kawamoto Otsuka (b, 04/10/1908) was the second oldest child and oldest daughter of Kaichi and Itsuno Kawamoto. Jeanette attended Carson's Beauty School in Tacoma. Prior to World War II Jeanette lived in Seattle with her husband, Eiichi \"Eddie\" Otsuka. They operated the Benton Hotel in downtown Seattle from December 1934 to March 1942. The Benton Hotel was located at 1420 6th Avenue the current location of the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Seattle. During World War II, Jeanette and her husband worked alongside her parents, sister, and brother-in-law on Roy Abe's farm in Caldwell, Idaho.\r\n\r\nEiichi \"Eddie\" Otsuka (b. 08/01/1903) immigrated to the United States from Kamihonami Fukuoka-ken Japan in 1919. Eddie worked first as a mechanic and later operated the Benton Hotel in downtown Seattle with his wife, Jeanette. During World War II he joined his wife and in-laws in Caldwell, Idaho working on Roy Abe's farm after being granted permanent leave. After the war Eddie and Jeanette returned to Washington.",
    "record_lastmod": "2019-07-25T09:04:47"
}