List children for a collection or collection object

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            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-1",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "0 0/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-1/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-1/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-kfred-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-kfred-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Fred Korematsu Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born January 30, 1919, in Oakland, California. Mr. Korematsu was working as a welder in San Francisco when Japan bombed Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. After Executive Order 9066 was issued in 1942, he decided to resist the evacuation orders, and was not removed with his family. He was arrested in May of 1942, taken to jail, and eventually transferred to the Tanforan Assembly Center, California, where his family was being held. He legally challenged the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066, and his case made it to the U.S. Supreme Court, which upheld the order in 1944. Following World War II, Mr. Korematsu moved to Detroit, Michigan, where he married and raised a family before returning to California. In the early 1980s, his case was reopened after the discovery of a crucial document indicating that in the original 1944 case, the federal government had lied to the high court. The conviction was vacated by U.S. District Judge Marilyn Hall Patel in 1983, and in 1998, Mr. Korematsu was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>.</p><p>This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "01:13:52",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-1",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 205,
                    "namepart": "Fred Korematsu"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-2",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "1 1/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-2/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-2/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-hgordon-06-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-hgordon-06-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Gordon Hirabayashi Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born April 23, 1918, in Seattle, Washington. Spent most of his childhood in Thomas, Washington, where his parents were part of a Christian farming co-op. Attended the University of Washington where he was active in the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA), the conscientious objector movement, and became a Quaker. At the outbreak of World War II, he was one of only a handful of individuals to challenge the curfew and removal orders being enforced against Japanese on the West Coast, citing \"Christian principles,\" and asserting \"a duty to maintain the democratic standards for which this nation lives.\" He turned himself in to the FBI, was found guilty, and served time for violating the curfew order, and failing to report for \"evacuation.\" While serving time for this conviction, Gordon was served with a draft notice and again, refused to comply. He subsequently served another period of time as a draft resister. In 1943 the Supreme Court upheld his convictions. Some forty years postwar, in 1986, his case was reopened and his convictions surrounding the incarceration were vacated by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, arguing in part that, \"racial bias was the cornerstone of the internment orders.\" Gordon Hirabayashi passed away in January of 2012.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>.</p><p>This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "01:15:22",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-2",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 19,
                    "namepart": "Gordon Hirabayashi"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Edmonton, Alberta, Canada",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-3",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "2 2/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-3/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-3/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-yminoru-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-yminoru-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Minoru Yasui Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Born October 19, 1916, in Hood River, Oregon. Earned a law degree from the University of Oregon law school and was practicing law prior to World War II. In 1942, deliberately defied the curfew imposed upon Japanese Americans in Portland, Oregon, and was arrested. His case was tried, and he was sentenced to one year in prison and given a $5000 fine. The appeal eventually reached the Supreme Court, which ruled that the government did have the authority to restrict the lives of civilian citizens during wartime. Yasui's fine was removed and he was released to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. In the 1980s, his case was reopened under writ of error coram nobis, and 1986 his conviction was overturned by the Oregon federal court.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>.</p><p>This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:44:28",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-3",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 519,
                    "namepart": "Minoru Yasui"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Hood River, Oregon",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-4",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "3 3/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-4/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-4/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-uchico-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-uchico-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Chico Uyeda Interview",
            "description": "Nisei male. Grew up in Los Angeles, California. Family moved to the Fresno area to avoid going to camp, but was still sent to the Fresno assembly center, California. Was a member of an advance crew that went early to help set up the Jerome concentration camp, Arkansas.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:47:48",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-4",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 714,
                    "namepart": "Chico Uyeda"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-5",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "4 4/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-5/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-5/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-ichizuko_g-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-ichizuko_g-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Chizuko Iyama - Ernie Iyama Interview",
            "description": "Nisei female and Nisei male. Both grew up in California. During World War II, Chizuko was removed to the Santa Anita assembly center, California, and the Topaz concentration camp, Utah. Ernie was removed to the Tanforan assembly center, California, and the Topaz concentration camp, Utah.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:36:07",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-5",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 715,
                    "namepart": "Ernie Iyama"
                },
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 724,
                    "namepart": "Chizuko Iyama"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "El Cerrito, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-6",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "5 5/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-6/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-6/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-mdale-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-mdale-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Dale Minami Interview I",
            "description": "Sansei male. Born in Los Angeles, California on October 13, 1946, and grew up in Gardena, California. Received B.A. in Political Science from University of Southern California, graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1968. Received J.D., 1971, from Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California. Mr. Minami was a co-founder of the Asian Law Caucus, Inc., a co-founder of the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of the Greater Bay Area, the Asian Pacific Bar of California and the Coalition of Asian Pacific Americans. He was involved in significant litigation affecting civil rights of Asian Pacific Americans and other minorities, including Korematsu v. United States, a lawsuit to overturn a 40 year old conviction for refusal to obey exclusion orders aimed at Japanese Americans during WWII, originally upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in landmark decisions; United Pilipinos for Affirmative Action v. California Blue Shield, the first class action employment lawsuit brought by Asian Pacific Americans on behalf of Asian Pacific Americans; Spokane JACL v. Washington State University, a class action on behalf of Asian Pacific Americans to establish an Asian American Studies program at Washington State University; and Nakanishi v. UCLA, a claim for unfair denial of tenure which resulted in the granting of tenure after widespread publicity over discrimination in academia. Mr. Minami represents Kristi Yamaguchi, the 1992 Olympic Gold Medal skater, playwright Philip Kan Gotanda, actor Lane Nishikawa, and others in the fields of media and entertainment. He is counsel to the National Asian American Telecommunications Association and the Asian American Journalists' Association. Mr. Minami has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Mills College in Oakland, CA and has been a Commissioner of the State of California's Fair Employment and Housing Commission, a Commissioner on the State Bar of California, Commission on Judicial Nominees Evaluation, the Chair of the Attorney General's Asian/Pacific Advisory Committee and a Member of Senator Barbara Boxer's Judicial Screening Committee. He was Chair of the Civil Liberties Public Education Fund Commission, appointed by President Clinton in 1994. Mr. Minami has received numerous awards including the State Bar President's Pro bono Service Award, an honorary Juris Doctor degree from the McGeorge School of Law, designation of a dormitory at the University of California at Santa Cruz as the \"Queen Liliuokalani-Minami\" Dormitory, awards from the Coro Foundation, the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California, the Harry Dow Memorial Fellowship in Boston, the Fred Korematsu Civil Rights Fund Award, the Organization of Chinese Americans, the Japanese American Youth Center and the Centro Legale de la Raza. Mr. Minami is a partner with Minami, Lew and Tamaki in San Francisco, and specializes in personal injury and entertainment law.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:10:42",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-6",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 134,
                    "namepart": "Dale Minami"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-7",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "6 6/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-7/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-7/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-mdale-03-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-mdale-03-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Dale Minami Interview II",
            "description": "Sansei male. Born in Los Angeles, California on October 13, 1946, and grew up in Gardena, California. Received B.A. in Political Science from University of Southern California, graduated magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1968. Received J.D., 1971, from Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California. Mr. Minami was a co-founder of the Asian Law Caucus, Inc., a co-founder of the Asian Pacific American Bar Association of the Greater Bay Area, the Asian Pacific Bar of California and the Coalition of Asian Pacific Americans. He was involved in significant litigation affecting civil rights of Asian Pacific Americans and other minorities, including Korematsu v. United States, a lawsuit to overturn a 40 year old conviction for refusal to obey exclusion orders aimed at Japanese Americans during WWII, originally upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in landmark decisions; United Pilipinos for Affirmative Action v. California Blue Shield, the first class action employment lawsuit brought by Asian Pacific Americans on behalf of Asian Pacific Americans; Spokane JACL v. Washington State University, a class action on behalf of Asian Pacific Americans to establish an Asian American Studies program at Washington State University; and Nakanishi v. UCLA, a claim for unfair denial of tenure which resulted in the granting of tenure after widespread publicity over discrimination in academia. Mr. Minami represents Kristi Yamaguchi, the 1992 Olympic Gold Medal skater, playwright Philip Kan Gotanda, actor Lane Nishikawa, and others in the fields of media and entertainment. He is counsel to the National Asian American Telecommunications Association and the Asian American Journalists' Association. Mr. Minami has taught at University of California, Berkeley and Mills College in Oakland, CA and has been a Commissioner of the State of California's Fair Employment and Housing Commission, a Commissioner on the State Bar of California, Commission on Judicial Nominees Evaluation, the Chair of the Attorney General's Asian/Pacific Advisory Committee and a Member of Senator Barbara Boxer's Judicial Screening Committee. He was Chair of the Civil Liberties Public Education Fund Commission, appointed by President Clinton in 1994. Mr. Minami has received numerous awards including the State Bar President's Pro bono Service Award, an honorary Juris Doctor degree from the McGeorge School of Law, designation of a dormitory at the University of California at Santa Cruz as the \"Queen Liliuokalani-Minami\" Dormitory, awards from the Coro Foundation, the Japanese Cultural and Community Center of Northern California, the Harry Dow Memorial Fellowship in Boston, the Fred Korematsu Civil Rights Fund Award, the Organization of Chinese Americans, the Japanese American Youth Center and the Centro Legale de la Raza. Mr. Minami is a partner with Minami, Lew and Tamaki in San Francisco, and specializes in personal injury and entertainment law.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:14:50",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-7",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 134,
                    "namepart": "Dale Minami"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-8",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "7 7/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-8/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-8/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-kfred_g-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-kfred_g-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Fred Korematsu - Kathryn Korematsu Interview",
            "description": "This interview centers on the experiences of Fred Korematsu, a Nisei who challenged the constitutionality of Executive Order 9066, which authorized the mass removal of Japanese Americans during World War II. Mr. Korematsu lost his initial legal case in 1944, but in the early 1980s, his case was reopened after the discovery of a crucial document indicating that in the original 1944 case, the federal government had lied to the high court. The conviction was vacated by U.S. District Judge Marilyn Hall Patel in 1983.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:32:42",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-8",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 205,
                    "namepart": "Fred Korematsu"
                },
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 206,
                    "namepart": "Kathryn Korematsu"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-9",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "8 8/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-9/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-9/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-hgordon_g-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-hgordon_g-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Gordon Hirabayashi - Jim Hirabayashi Interview",
            "description": "This interview is with Gordon Hirabayashi and his brother Jim Hirabayashi, and focuses on Gordon's World War II experiences. Gordon defied the curfew and removal orders in 1942, and was arrested, convicted, and imprisoned. Gordon Hirabayashi's conviction was vacated in 1986.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:26:08",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-9",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 19,
                    "namepart": "Gordon Hirabayashi"
                },
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 140,
                    "namepart": "Jim Hirabayashi"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-10",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "9 9/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-10/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-10/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-sgus-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-sgus-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Gus J. Solomon Interview",
            "description": "Gus J. Solomon, U.S. federal district judge from Portland, Oregon, was involved in Min Yasui's case on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union. In 1942, Min Yasui deliberately defied the curfew imposed upon Japanese Americans in Portland, Oregon, and was arrested. His case was tried, and he was sentenced to one year in prison and given a $5000 fine. The appeal eventually reached the Supreme Court, which ruled that the government did have the authority to restrict the lives of civilian citizens during wartime. Yasui's fine was removed and he was released to the Minidoka concentration camp, Idaho. In the 1980s, his case was reopened under writ of error <i>coram nobis</i>, and 1986 his conviction was overturned by the Oregon federal court.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:14:08",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-10",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 716,
                    "namepart": "Gus J. Solomon"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "Portland, Oregon",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-11",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "10 10/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-11/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-11/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-sjanice_g-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-sjanice_g-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Janice Sakamoto - Beth Shironaka Interview",
            "description": "This interview is with two Sansei women and focuses on their experiences growing up and learning about their Nisei parents' wartime incarceration experiences.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:19:29",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-11",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 717,
                    "namepart": "Janice Sakamoto"
                },
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 797,
                    "namepart": "Beth Shironaka"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
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            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-12",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "11 11/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-hjim_g-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-hjim_g-01-a.jpg"
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            "title": "Jim Hirabayashi - Rick Shiomi Interview",
            "description": "This interview is with Japanese Canadian playwright Rick Shiomi and Jim Hirabayashi, brother of Gordon Hirabayashi, who defied the curfew and removal orders in 1942, and was arrested, convicted, and imprisoned. Gordon Hirabayashi's conviction was vacated in 1986.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:16:48",
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                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 140,
                    "namepart": "Jim Hirabayashi"
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                    "id": 718,
                    "namepart": "Rick Shiomi"
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            "language": [
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            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
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            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-13",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "12 12/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
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                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-kjim_g-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-kjim_g-01-a.jpg"
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            "title": "Jim Kajiwara - Sox Kitashima Interview",
            "description": "This interview is with a Nisei couple who were married in 1942 and were incarcerated in the Tanforan Assembly Center, California, and the Topaz concentration camp, Utah, during World War II.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:19:29",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-13",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 719,
                    "namepart": "Jim Kajiwara"
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                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 720,
                    "namepart": "Sox Kitashima"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
        {
            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-14",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "13 13/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-14/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-14/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-blorraine-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-blorraine-02-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Lorraine Bannai Interview",
            "description": "Sansei female. Born 1955 in Los Angeles, CA. Grew up in Gardena, CA, surrounded by a large Japanese American community. Influenced by father's role in community and politics, and mother's emphasis on education. Attended University of California, Santa Barbara where she became increasingly aware of Japanese American history, issues of ethnic identity and racial inequality. Attended the University of San Francisco School of Law where she honed her commitment to political and social activism. Only a few years out of law school, she joined a team of lawyers working to reopen the Supreme Court's 1944 decision in <i>Korematsu v. United States</i>. Convicted of violating the exclusion order during World War II, Mr. Korematsu's case went all the way to the Supreme Court where the exclusion and incarceration of Japanese Americans was upheld as constitutional, based on the government's argument of \"military necessity.\" Through a petition for writ of error <i>coram nobis</i> (establishing that the case was premised on errors of fact withheld from the judge and the defense by the prosecution), the legal team reopened the case, provided evidence that the factual underpinnings to the exclusion orders were fraudulent, and successfully had the <i>Korematsu</i> conviction vacated, as well as a handful of other similar convictions. In this interview, Ms. Bannai discusses the <i>coram nobis</i> legal team, the support for the effort among the Japanese American community, and personal lessons gained from being a part of this effort.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:08:03",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-14",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 112,
                    "namepart": "Lorraine Bannai"
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            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
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            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-15",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "14 14/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
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                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-15/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-bnikki-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-bnikki-01-a.jpg"
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            "title": "Nikki Bridges Interview",
            "description": "Nisei female. Born February 2, 1911, and grew up in California. During World War II, removed to the Poston (Colorado River) concentration camp, Arizona. After leaving camp, worked in the War Relocation Authority office in San Francisco.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:13:03",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-15",
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                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 721,
                    "namepart": "Nikki Bridges"
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            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
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            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
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            "model": "entity",
            "index": "15 15/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-16/",
                "json": "http://ddr.densho.org/api/0.2/ddr-densho-1012-16/",
                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-ipeter-03-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-ipeter-03-a.jpg"
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            "title": "Peter Irons Interview",
            "description": "White male. Born 1940 in Salem, Massachusetts. Family moved frequently during his childhood due to father's employment. Strongly influenced by parents' values regarding racial tolerance and inclusion, and principles learned through Unitarian Church. While attending Antioch College in Ohio, became involved in political and social activism for civil rights. Joined the youth branch of NAACP, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and other groups. Active in sit-ins and other demonstrations addressing racial inequality, peace and related issues, eventually becoming a full-time organizer. Worked for the United Autoworkers Union. Resisted the draft, and was indicted by a federal grand jury in 1964. Convicted of failing to report for military service and sentenced to three years in prison. Graduated from Antioch College, 1966. Appealed his conviction to the United States Court of Appeals and lost. Served his sentence in federal institutions in Milan, Michigan, Terre Haute, Indiana, and Danbury, Connecticut. Following release from prison in 1969, attended graduate school at Boston University, obtaining PhD in political science in 1973. Accepted to Harvard Law School. While a law student, researched and filed a writ of error coram nobis with the federal court in which he had been convicted, and as a result had his conviction vacated. (Writ of error coram nobis establishes that the original case was premised on errors of fact withheld from the judge and the defense by the prosecution.) Graduated from Harvard Law School in 1978. Taught undergraduate and law school courses at several schools before joining faculty of the University of California at San Diego. While conducting research at the National Archives and Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. in preparation for writing a book, discovered evidence of governmental misconduct during World War II, which refuted the U.S. government's rationale of \"military necessity\" for the mass incarceration of persons of Japanese ancestry in 1942. Using this evidence, assisted the congressional Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. Contacted original defendants, initiated formation of legal teams, and was instrumental in filing petitions using the writ of error coram nobis, resulting in the reconsideration of the wartime \"internment cases\": Hirabayashi, Korematsu, and Yasui. Dr. Irons is a professor of political science and director of the Earl Warren Bill of Rights Project at the University of California, San Diego.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "01:06:01",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-16",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 122,
                    "namepart": "Peter Irons"
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            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
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            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-17",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "16 16/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
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                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-droger-02-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-droger-02-a.jpg"
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            "title": "Roger Daniels Interview",
            "description": "Caucasian male. Born December 1, 1927, in New York City, New York. Charles Phelps Taft Professor Emeritus of History, University of Cincinnati. Served as a consultant to the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians from 1981 to 1983. Has researched and written numerous books about the Japanese American experience, including <i>Prisoners Without Trial: Japanese Americans in World War II</i> and <i>American Concentration Camps: A Documentary History of the Relocation and Incarceration of Japanese Americans, 1941-1945</i>.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "01:33:15",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-17",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 166,
                    "namepart": "Roger Daniels"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
        },
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            "id": "ddr-densho-1012-18",
            "model": "entity",
            "index": "17 17/{'value': 18, 'relation': 'eq'}",
            "links": {
                "html": "http://ddr.densho.org/ddr-densho-1012-18/",
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                "img": "https://ddr.densho.org/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-ysharon-01-a.jpg",
                "thumb": "http://192.168.0.30/media/ddr-densho-1012/denshovh-ysharon-01-a.jpg"
            },
            "title": "Sharon Yuen Interview",
            "description": "Sansei female. Born July 1945 in Seattle, Washington. Daughter of Gordon Hirabayashi.<p>(This interview is audio-only. It contains raw footage used by Steven Okazaki in his 1985 film <i>Unfinished Business</i>. </p><p> This material is based upon work assisted by a grant from the Department of the Interior, National Park Service. Any opinions, finding, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of the Interior.)",
            "extent": "00:04:16",
            "links_children": "ddr-densho-1012-18",
            "creators": [
                {
                    "role": "narrator",
                    "id": 722,
                    "namepart": "Sharon Yuen"
                }
            ],
            "format": "vh",
            "language": [
                "eng"
            ],
            "contributor": "Steven Okazaki Collection",
            "rights": "cc",
            "genre": "interview",
            "location": "San Francisco, California",
            "status": "completed"
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